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What is the computational complexity of this loop in the Go programming language?

var a []int
for i := 0 ; i < n ; i++ {
  a = append(a, i)
}

Does append operate in linear time (reallocating memory and copying everything on each append), or in amortized constant time (like the way vector classes in many languages are implemnted)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The Go Programming Language Specification says that the append built-in function reallocates if necessary.

Appending to and copying slices

If the capacity of s is not large enough to fit the additional values, append allocates a new, sufficiently large slice that fits both the existing slice elements and the additional values. Thus, the returned slice may refer to a different underlying array.

The precise algorithm to grow the target slice, when necessary, for an append is implementation dependent. For the current gc compiler algorithm, see the growslice and growslice1 functions in the Go runtime slice.c source file. It's amortized constant time.

In part, the amount-to-grow slice computation reads:

m = x.cap;
if(m+m < newcap)
    m = newcap;
else {
    do {
        if(x.len < 1024)
            m += m;
        else
            m += m/4;
    } while(m < newcap);
}

ADDENDUM

The Go Programming Language Specification allows implementors of the language to implement the append built-in function in a number of ways.

For example, new allocations only have to be "sufficiently large". The amount allocated may be parsimonius, allocating the minimum necessary amount, or generous, allocating more than the minimum necessary amount to minimize the cost of resizing many times. The Go gc compiler uses a generous dynamic array amortized constant time algorithm.

The following code illustrates two legal implementations of the append built-in function. The generous constant function implements the same amortized constant time algorithm as the Go gc compiler. The parsimonius variable function, once the initial allocation is filled, reallocates and copies everything every time. The Go append function and the Go gccgo compiler are used as controls.

package main

import "fmt"

// Generous reallocation
func constant(s []int, x ...int) []int {
    if len(s)+len(x) > cap(s) {
        newcap := len(s) + len(x)
        m := cap(s)
        if m+m < newcap {
            m = newcap
        } else {
            for {
                if len(s) < 1024 {
                    m += m
                } else {
                    m += m / 4
                }
                if !(m < newcap) {
                    break
                }
            }
        }
        tmp := make([]int, len(s), m)
        copy(tmp, s)
        s = tmp
    }
    if len(s)+len(x) > cap(s) {
        panic("unreachable")
    }
    return append(s, x...)
}

// Parsimonious reallocation
func variable(s []int, x ...int) []int {
    if len(s)+len(x) > cap(s) {
        tmp := make([]int, len(s), len(s)+len(x))
        copy(tmp, s)
        s = tmp
    }
    if len(s)+len(x) > cap(s) {
        panic("unreachable")
    }
    return append(s, x...)
}

func main() {
    s := []int{0, 1, 2}
    x := []int{3, 4}
    fmt.Println("data    ", len(s), cap(s), s, len(x), cap(x), x)
    a, c, v := s, s, s
    for i := 0; i < 4096; i++ {
        a = append(a, x...)
        c = constant(c, x...)
        v = variable(v, x...)
    }
    fmt.Println("append  ", len(a), cap(a), len(x))
    fmt.Println("constant", len(c), cap(c), len(x))
    fmt.Println("variable", len(v), cap(v), len(x))
}

Output:

gc:

data     3 3 [0 1 2] 2 2 [3 4]
append   8195 9152 2
constant 8195 9152 2
variable 8195 8195 2

gccgo:

data     3 3 [0 1 2] 2 2 [3 4]
append   8195 9152 2
constant 8195 9152 2
variable 8195 8195 2

To summarize, depending on the implementation, once the initial capacity is filled, the append built-in function may or may not reallocate on every call.

References:

Dynamic array

Amortized analysis

Appending to and copying slices

If the capacity of s is not large enough to fit the additional values, append allocates a new, sufficiently large slice that fits both the existing slice elements and the additional values. Thus, the returned slice may refer to a different underlying array.

Append to a slice specification discussion

The spec (at tip and 1.0.3) states:

"If the capacity of s is not large enough to fit the additional values, append allocates a new, sufficiently large slice that fits both the existing slice elements and the additional values. Thus, the returned slice may refer to a different underlying array."

Should this be an "If and only if"? For example, if I know the capacity of my slice is sufficiently long, am I assured that I will not change the underlying array?

Rob Pike

Yes you are so assured.

runtime slice.c source file

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Yeah, though it would be nice for the language or library reference to specify the complexity of this though, so users can rely on the complexity when writing large applications. –  newacct Mar 29 '13 at 22:56

It doesn't reallocate on every append and it is quite explicitly stated in the docs:

If the capacity of s is not large enough to fit the additional values, append allocates a new, sufficiently large slice that fits both the existing slice elements and the additional values. Thus, the returned slice may refer to a different underlying array.

Amortized constant time is thus the complexity asked about.

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1  
That doesn't say that "It doesn't reallocate on every append." It just says that it reallocates if necessary. –  peterSO Mar 29 '13 at 12:42
1  
@peterSO: Rob Pike, one of the language authors, begs to differ: groups.google.com/d/msg/golang-nuts/o5rFNqd0VjA/HzJHwgl1y6MJ –  zzzz Apr 1 '13 at 20:56
    
No, he doesn't. I've added an addendum to my answer. –  peterSO Apr 2 '13 at 5:34
    
@peterSO: Which of the words in "Yes you are so assured." is not clearly communicating what's the Rob' answer to the [mailing list] OP question? (which was: "For example, if I know the capacity of my slice is sufficiently long, am I assured that I will not change the underlying array?") ;-) –  zzzz Apr 2 '13 at 5:59

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