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I am setting up some very simple test tables and would like to make the column USERKEY the primary key of my table tb_TestUSERS then make the column USERKEY the foreign key in the table tb_TestFACT. Then set up a relationship between this primary key and foreign key. I'd like to be able to do all of this using scripts.

So far I just have the basic table scripts:

CREATE TABLE WH.dbo.tb_TestFACT
(DATEKEY INT,USERKEY INT);
INSERT INTO WH.dbo.tb_TestFACT
    values
    (1,1),
    (2,1),
    (3,2),
    (4,2),
    (5,2),
    (6,3),
    (7,3);

CREATE TABLE WH.dbo.tb_TestUSERS
(USERKEY INT,NAME VARCHAR(10));
INSERT INTO WH.dbo.tb_TestUSERS
    values
    (1,'FRED'),
    (2,'PHIL'),
    (3,'JACKO'); 
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE tb_TestUSERS
(
    UserKey INT NOT NULL,
    Name VARCHAR(30),
    CONSTRAINT tb_pk PRIMARY KEY (UserKey),
    CONSTRAINT tb_uq UNIQUE (Name)
)
GO

CREATE TABLE tb_TestFACT
(
    UserKey INT NOT NULL,
    DateKey INT NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT tb_fk FOREIGN KEY (UserKey)
        REFERENCES tb_TestUSERS(UserKey),
    CONSTRAINT tb_uq1 UNIQUE (UserKey, DateKey) 
)
GO
share|improve this answer
    
+1 @J_W are the lines CONSTRAINT tb_uq UNIQUE (Name) and CONSTRAINT tb_uq1 UNIQUE (UserKey, DateKey) essential? I realise duplicate names would be strange but is this constrainst essential? – whytheq Mar 29 '13 at 12:40
    
CONSTRAINT tb_uq UNIQUE (Name) you can remove that if you want user to have the same name. CONSTRAINT tb_uq1 UNIQUE (UserKey, DateKey) will enforce a UserKey can have only unique DateKey. – John Woo Mar 29 '13 at 12:43
1  
thanks - might leave that off aswell as in the bigger picture a user might have lots of sessions on the same day - thanks for including these extra CONTRAINT scripts though as I will make wide use of them in production schema. – whytheq Mar 29 '13 at 12:52
    
you're welcome :D – John Woo Mar 29 '13 at 12:53
    
...so your example demonstrates the three possible keys that can be applied in sql-server? Primary/Foreign/Unique? That also being the order of their "strength"? – whytheq Jun 4 '13 at 6:57

If you have SQL Server Management Studio or SQL Server Management Studio Express then you can actually get it to do it for you. Alternatively, you can do this in the UI and get it to script it to a new window - all very useful facilities.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks for comments – whytheq Apr 13 '13 at 20:02

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