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The following program crashes with segmention fault:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct data
{
  data() : a(random()), b(random()), v({random(), random(), random()}) {}
  data(data&& m) noexcept : a(m.a), b(m.b), v(std::move(m.v)) { }

  long int a;
  long int b;
  std::vector<long int> v;
};

data&& randomize()
{
  srandom(time(0));
  data d;
  d.a = random();
  return std::move(d);
}

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
  data d = randomize();
  cout << d.a << " " << d.b << endl;
  return 0;
}

The code is compiled with g++ version 4.7.2 (Debian 4.7.2-5):

g++ -std=c++11 -g test.cpp

What am I doing wrong? The problem seems to be in std::vector move constructor, cause everything works fine without it. It looks like data object from randomize() is destroyed when function finishes, but shouldn't it rather be moved to the data object in main first?

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closed as too localized by Bo Persson, joce, Peter DeWeese, Javier, karthikr Mar 30 '13 at 3:18

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3  
Note that there's no need to return an rvalue reference here (even if it were valid to return a reference to a local automatic variable). Function return values are always moved if possible. – Mike Seymour Mar 29 '13 at 12:37
up vote 11 down vote accepted

This function:

data&& randomize()
{
    // ...
    data d
    // ...
    return std::move(d);
}

Returns a reference to a local object which is going to be destroyed when the call returns. Therefore, your program has Undefined Behavior. Therefore, the returned reference will be dangling by the time the move constructor of data is invoked here:

data d = randomize();

You should return a value of type data, and you shouldn't explicitly invoke std::move():

data randomize()
{
    // ...
    data d
    // ...
    return d;
}

This way, you will also give the compiler the opportunity to performed (Named) Return Value Optimization, possibly resulting in no call to the move constructor at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! But will this optimization be always performed by gcc, or there are some exceptions? – Pavel Davydov Mar 29 '13 at 12:56
    
@PavelDavydov: You're welcome :) It is completely up to the compiler to decide, and you should never rely on the assumption that this elision is or is not performed. You just can't tell. In this case, however, what will happen is that with a sufficiently high optimization level any compiler should elide the call to the move constructor. But again, this is by no means something you should rely on. – Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 12:59

I think this will work and won't depend on compiler optimizations:

data randomize()
{
    // ...
    data d
    // ...
    return std::move(d);
}

The return value has to be constructed before destruction of local variable d.

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