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I have a couple of problems regarding floating element alignment, I'm trying to make table cell that has a couple of elements inside. Like text input and then dropdown, and only text input should be resized when user resize browser window. Here, how I do it:

<table style="width: 100%;">
    <tr style="vertical-align: bottom;">
        <td style="white-space: nowrap; width: 20%;">
            <div><span style="float: right; display: block;">
                <select style="display:show;width:60px">
                    <option selected="" value="1">1</option>
                    <option value="2">2</option>
                </select>
                </span> <span style="display: block; overflow: hidden; padding-right: 2px;">
                <input type="text" value="100.0" style="width:100%; text-align:right"/>
            </span></div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

but floating element appears a bit upper that non-floating. enter image description here

Also I have another case when I have link, then input text field, then dropdown or another link, again, input field should be the only resizible element.

here is the code

<table style="width: 100%;">
    <tr style="vertical-align: bottom;">
        <td style="white-space:nowrap; width: 30%;">
          <span style="display: block; float: left; padding-top: 3px;">
            <a href="return false;"><img width="14" height="14" src=""/>
            </a>&nbsp;
          </span>
          <span style="float: right; display: block; padding-top: 5px;">
        <a href="return false;">&nbsp;?</a>
          </span>
          <span style="display: block; overflow: hidden; padding-right: 2px;">
        <input value=""style="width: 100%;">
          </span>
         </td>
    </tr>
</table>

what in this case, is that non-floating element is upper that the others:

enter image description here

Basically, I need to somehow vertically align floating element in the first sample, so it bottom will be the same as bottom of non-floating element and in the second sample i need to somehow align bottom of non-floating element, so it'll be the same as floating elements.

I'm trying to make it work in ie 7, 8, 9, 10.

Adding paddings will do the trick, but then it'll look ugly in firefox, chrome.

Edit:

Or at least tell me why this can't be done.

Edit2:

Or if the problem is with table tag? So I need use something different (divs). The whole structure is a table with only difference that there are some selects and such a like in cells, so it's very natural to use table here. But, well, if problem is with table, I'll try to recreate it with divs.

Edit3:

Even if I remove table, right floating element in sample 1 is a bit higher. I tried to replace float with padding and absolute positioning, but still it's higher.

Edit4:

For sample 1, if I set display: none for left element, then floating element vertical position becomes normal.

*** UPDATE: Sorry that was my mistake to put bounty on this question, i've already solved my problem.***
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5  
I'd restructure without tables, which aren't really for layout anyway and tend to cause headaches like this. You can use {display: table} where needed on other element types to get vertical centering. –  isherwood Mar 29 '13 at 13:26
1  
@isherwood according to this: quirksmode.org/css/css2/display.html {display: table} isn't supported in IE 7. –  dhblah Apr 1 '13 at 5:32
    
do not use in-line styling it gives me headache. use this in your css file. It resets all the values so you can work on your code with no problems. –  shnisaka Apr 1 '13 at 5:46
    
@shnisaka I didn't test your solution thoroughly, but at least it doesn't work for case 1 in ie 10. Select is still higher. –  dhblah Apr 1 '13 at 6:22
    
Sorry, I normally don't consider IE7 in my designs. –  isherwood Apr 1 '13 at 14:42

6 Answers 6

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/qARBL/1/

Before anything - Please, please, PLEASE, don't use inline styling - this is so old school! Use an external CSS stylesheet instead.

Add the following css to your HTML:

1.

<select style="display:show;width: 60px;margin: 0;">
    <option selected="" value="1">1</option>
    <option value="2">2</option>
</select>

2.

<input type="text" value="100.0" style="width:100%; text-align:right;margin: 0;padding: 0;">

Just adjusting the margin and the padding of the two elements above did the trick.

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1  
Actually it's fine, I thought the asker wanted same height :) +1 –  Daniel Imms Apr 1 '13 at 12:38
    
@Evan checked under ie 10. Doesn't work. –  dhblah Apr 1 '13 at 13:27
    
@dhblah what exactly isn't working ? –  What have you tried Apr 5 '13 at 13:11
    
@Evan dropdown is a bit on top. –  dhblah Apr 5 '13 at 14:46
    
@dhblah would you be open to a slightly new HTML design? Do you need to use a table? Do you need to use only one cell? Things like that would help to know, thanks! –  What have you tried Apr 5 '13 at 15:13

At least I found solution for case 1. Misplaced floating element can be fixed by replacing float with position: absolute; right: 0; bottom: 0; bottom: 0 is important part. Not to forget, that padding right should be added to the input on the left and outer element position should be changed to relative.

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but why would you want to use absolute positioning? You should avoid that when possibly since it doesn't make for "responsive" designs –  What have you tried Apr 1 '13 at 12:42
    
@Evan i decided not to do absolute, left float instead. I just found in w3c doc about float layout that floating element goes left or right top until it reaches box of the parent. Also it seems that in firefox that's not the case, as some small space between floating element and container preserved. And because of this I can't fix the problem by adding paddings. Because in IE and chrome this will look nice, while in FF element will be moved down. –  dhblah Apr 2 '13 at 5:16
    
Actually, problem with FF appears only in linux. =( In windows 8 it looks fine =(. In windows 7 it also works fine in FF. Probably there are some special internal styles in linux FF. –  dhblah Apr 2 '13 at 5:37

You cannot use float and vertical-align parallel. floated elements are always vertical-align: top.

If you use display: inline-block instead, you can (With hack of *zoom: 1, *display:inline; for IE lt 9).

Unfortunanately with this method the whitespaces in the HTML code will show in the result. There are two workarounds for this.

  1. If you have full source control, remove the whitespace in your code
  2. Give the surrounding block a font-size of 0

See here some demonstration code: http://jsfiddle.net/HerrSerker/3yMcS/

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I'm really not getting what you're trying to achieve with your markup/css, but maybe that's because you're using table + floating + vertically aligning something. Anyways, I cleaned the first problem up, thought of posting the code here:

<style type="text/css">
.container { vertical-align: bottom; }
.content { white-space: nowrap; width: 20%; }
.col1 { float: right; display: block; }
.col1 select { display: block; width: 60px }
.col2 { display: block; overflow: hidden; padding-right: 2px; }
.col2 input { width: 100%; text-align: right }
</style>

<div class="container">
    <div class="content">
        <div class="col1">
            <select>
                <option selected="" value="1">1</option>
                <option value="2">2</option>
            </select>
        </div>
        <div class="col2">
            <input type="text" value="100.0"/>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

See it at work here: http://jsfiddle.net/dreamyguy/MKQ75/

Note that display: show is not valid CSS, so I changed it to display: block.

Another thing to be aware of, is that floated elements are as slippery as absolutely positioned elements. They fall out of the normal flow of the document and therefore should be handled with care. Don't float an element unless you must, and if you do, make changes to the styles of the parent & siblings - so that you get the results you'd expect.

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I dont get the need for aligning all the elements at the bottom, but since its been provided in CSS and you need it so what the heck.

I dont see anything wrong in your approach to use table instead of div. As a matter of fact It would help you to keep the width of the other elements fixed as your input box grows or shrinks in size.

I would suggest you to have more than one td tag, put your element in separate td tags and put the width on the table or tr instead of the td tag.Instead of using too many span elements to add inline-css(its not old school), add it to the td tag or your element tag. If its getting to tough to comprehend here is the jsfiddle

<table style="width: 100%;">
<tr style="width:20%;">
    <td style="white-space: nowrap;">
        <span style="display: block; overflow: hidden; padding-right: 2px;">
            <input type="text" value="100.0" style="width:100%;text-align:right"/>
        </span>
    </td>
    <td style="white-space: nowrap;width:60px;">
        <select style="width:60px">
            <option selected="" value="1">1</option>
            <option value="2">2</option>
        </select>
    </td>
</tr>
</table>


<hr>

<table style="width: 100%;">
<tr style="width: 30%;">
    <td style="white-space:nowrap;width:16px;height:auto; ">
        <a href="return false;"><img width="14" height="14" src=""/>
        </a>
    </td>
    <td>
      <input type="text" value="" style="width: 98%;margin:2px;">
    </td>
    <td style="width:14px;">
     <a href="return false;">&nbsp;?</a>
    </td>
</tr>
</table>

In the css section by un-commenting the border section, you would see how your elements stack up with each other in the table in each respective row.
Also by un-commenting the vertical-align property and changing it to the middle, you would see a much better layout though I am not sure if your particular case needs it the way you ask for.

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Using tables combined with inline styles to present non-tabular data is not only "so 1998": it is extremely costly to maintain, invites all kind of unpredictable behavior when the CSS's ambition increases in complexity, is bad for loading times, restrains flexibility of scripts and styling, increases footprint of code, decreases readability, etc. Some people have a wrong perception that this way of coding "increases compatibility with older browsers", but that's not true. I would never hire someone that codes this way, and would definitely fire a developer that insisted in coding this way. –  Wallace Sidhrée Apr 9 '13 at 21:29
    
@WallaceSidhrée I found out more on what you did point out - Browsers don't display a table at all until they can calculate its size. That doesnt mean you dont use them, but only use it wisely not to display large data set when not required. Break it down, there must be a reason to why we still have table tag in HTML While smaller tables load faster , tables with height and width load the fastest. I have not been able to find any arguments on restraining flexibility of scripts and styling, yet. As a matter of fact we have various js libs to style and display large data sets in table tags. –  li8 Apr 10 '13 at 19:46
    
BE NICE and I quote "Bring your sense of humor", thats what stackoverflow says. If you have missed here is the link . Its not a place to give personal advice or opinion on RECRUITMENT/FIRING people. Stick to coding , no one wants to hire you as a RECRUITER and I would definitely fire you as one for calling people "OLD SCHOOL" (Sense of humor is not so big to carry) –  li8 Apr 10 '13 at 19:54
    
I apologize if my comment came out harsher than intended - I meant no disrespect. But I was honest about what I think when it comes to encouraging the use of tables for presentation of non-tabular data: it's one of the worst practices when laying out the foundations of a markup. A table's sole purpose is to present tabular data, like a spreadsheet in Excel. Taking that into consideration, if someone came up to me saying that a spreadsheet structure could be used to build a whole website, I would definitely not like to work with that person. The firing/hiring part was just how I put it... –  Wallace Sidhrée Apr 10 '13 at 22:32
    
For me it's more like using a shoe to hammer a nail, or a axe to cut bread. The nail gets nailed, the bread gets cut, but in quirky ways. We are all human beings with opinions, emotions and ups & downs. Code is not necessarily free of advice nor opinion. I believe that the code we write is a statement of our opinions, since that is how we would solve a particular programming challenge... And by the way, you just fired me... Are you a recruiter? Hehe... Peace, mate! –  Wallace Sidhrée Apr 10 '13 at 22:53

I've tried a different approach, supposing you can set a fixed with for the other elements that doesn't need to resize you can take advantage of calc() and avoid using float and table.

Here's the demo: http://jsfiddle.net/RcSfF/

HTML

<input/><select><option>a</option></select>

CSS

input,select{
    box-sizing: border-box;
}
input{ 
    width: calc(100% - 60px);
}
select{
    width: 60px;
}

You'll need a polyfill to emulate calc on old browsers.

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