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I am trying to learn unit testing and have the following situation I just cant get my head around:

  1. I have a model: SalesOrder - which models orders in an ecommerce store
  2. The SalesOrder has a property called gift_message_id
  3. The gift message id is an integer value and is a foreign key to a GiftMessage model
  4. The GiftMessage model has a method that can take an order model and load a GiftMessage instance correctly based on the SalesOrder.

I am trying to write a test that accurately tests this behaviour but I am ending up with 2 mocks: 1 for the SalesOrder and 1 for the GiftMessage and it doesnt make sense. What am i doing wrong here?

The method I am trying to test looks like this:

public function loadGiftMessageByOrderModel(SalesOrder $order)
{
    $giftMessageId = $order->getGiftMessageId();

    //if the order has a gift message id then load the gift message model and return it
    if ($giftMessageId !== false) {
        return new GiftMessage($giftMessageId);
    }
    return false;
}

How can this be unit tested, bearing in mind that the order and the gift message data are stored in a database.

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I agree, unit testing is a joke –  bivoc Mar 29 '13 at 14:32
    
I think its valuable - but i just cant work out how to do this and make the test worthwhile –  Marty Wallace Mar 29 '13 at 14:34
    
To be honest, I don't really understand your description and what exactly you want to test. In general, if you want to test class X, you either mock or instantiate all external entities, regardless of how many those are. Of course, keeping things coupled loosely is an advantage here. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Mar 29 '13 at 14:40
    
I want to test that, if an order has a gift message id, then a gift message model is returned otherwise false is returned. I can easily mock the SalesOrder model to return a gift message id. The bit i cant work out how to do is to load a new GiftMessage from that id and return it. This is because the GiftMessage constructor takes an id and loads that from the database –  Marty Wallace Mar 29 '13 at 14:43
    
How are you passing the db connection to the GiftMessage object? You have some global state here which makes your system hard to be tested and potentially really buggy. –  Ocramius Mar 29 '13 at 14:51
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2 Answers 2

Any time you have a method that calls a constructor and non-trivial work is done in the constructor, you are in trouble. The best option I would see from the above is to have the above class hold a GiftMessageFactory instance. Then you can mock the factory to validate that it is called with the appropriate values and the appropriate times.

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As you've written the loadGiftMessageByOrderModel function and explained the GiftMessage constructor, I don't think you can easily unit test this code. In order to cleanly test it, you need to load the GiftMessage from the DB in a method that is not the constructor. Your constructor shouldn't be calling methods that interact with the database. Another class or method should do that load, and then call the constructor. Roughly, something like this:

public function loadGiftMessageByOrderModel(SalesOrder $order)
{
    $giftMessageId = $order->getGiftMessageId();

    //if the order has a gift message id then load the gift message model and return it
    if ($giftMessageId !== false) {
        // $giftMessageLoader handles loading from the DB; it doesn't create a GiftMessage object
        $giftMessageRecord = $giftMessageLoader.loadById( $giftMessageId );
        // $giftMessageFactory actually calls the constructor to create a GiftMessage
        return $giftMessageFactory.createFromRecord( $giftMessageRecord );
    }
    return false;
}

Then, you can mock the $giftMessageLoader.loadById call so you control what's returned from the database. You'll also be able to test that the $giftMessageFactory calls the GiftMessage constructor appropriately and creates the proper object.

The overall lesson here is that constructors should be simple. They can validate parameters so the object is constructed correctly, but they probably shouldn't be calling other significant pieces of your application.

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