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I have a dataset like this:

[[0,1],
 [0,2],
 [0,3],
 [0,4],
 [1,5],
 [1,6],
 [1,7],
 [2,8],
 [2,9]]

I need to delete the first elements of each subview of the data as defined by the first column. So first I get all elements that have 0 in the first column, and delete the first row: [0,1]. Then I get the elements with 1 in the first column and delete the first row [1,5], next step I delete [2,8] and so on and so forth. In the end, I would like to have a dataset like this:

[[0,2],
 [0,3],
 [0,4],
 [1,6],
 [1,7],
 [2,9]]

EDIT: Can this be done in numpy? My dataset is very large so for loops on all elements take at least 4 minutes to complete.

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What have you tried, and where are you stuck? You'll get more, better, answers to specific questions than to general "please do my problem for me" statements. –  Robᵩ Mar 29 '13 at 14:48
    
@Robᵩ I've tried to use masks to get each subview and delete the row in the subview, but then I don't know how to delete the row in the original dataset. Will post code soon –  siamii Mar 29 '13 at 14:50
    
Are these sorted? So, are nested lists with equal values at index 0 grouped? –  Martijn Pieters Mar 29 '13 at 14:51
    
@MartijnPieters yes, sorted –  siamii Mar 29 '13 at 14:52
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As requested, a numpy solution:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([[0,1], [0,2], [0,3], [0,4], [1,5], [1,6], [1,7], [2,8], [2,9]])
_,i = np.unique(a[:,0], return_index=True)

b = np.delete(a, i, axis=0)

(above is edited to incorporate @Jaime's solution, here is my original masking solution for posterity's sake)

m = np.ones(len(a), dtype=bool)
m[i] = False
b = a[m]

Interestingly, the mask seems to be faster:

In [225]: def rem_del(a):
   .....:     _,i = np.unique(a[:,0], return_index=True)
   .....:     return np.delete(a, i, axis = 0)
   .....: 

In [226]: def rem_mask(a):
   .....:     _,i = np.unique(a[:,0], return_index=True)
   .....:     m = np.ones(len(a), dtype=bool)
   .....:     m[i] = False
   .....:     return a[m]
   .....: 

In [227]: timeit rem_del(a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 181 us per loop

In [228]: timeit rem_mask(a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 59 us per loop
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1  
+1 But keeping the same general approach, wouldn't b = np.delete(a, i, axis=0) be a better option than those last three lines? –  Jaime Mar 29 '13 at 15:52
    
Thanks @Jaime, I had almost commented to say that the last bit probably has a better implementation :P –  askewchan Mar 29 '13 at 15:57
    
Although, @Jaime, the mask seems to be faster? –  askewchan Mar 29 '13 at 16:03
    
I just looked at the source code, and np.delete does something similar to what you do behind the scenes, but instead of indexing with a boolean array, it creates an array of np.intp, and then does a np.setdiff1d with the element indices to delete. It may be needed for higher dimensional indexing (not sure, really), but it is definitely slower than your approach. Is the minor readability improvement worth a 3x speed hit? I would tend to say no... –  Jaime Mar 29 '13 at 21:30
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Pass in your lists and the key that you want to check values on.

def getsubset(set, index):
    hash = {}
    for list in set:
        if not list[index] in hash:
            set.remove(list)
            hash[list[index]]  = list

    return set
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This is fast, but no need to return set as this mutates set in place. –  askewchan Mar 29 '13 at 16:23
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You want to use itertools.groupby() with a dash of itertools.islice() and itertools.chain:

from itertools import islice, chain, groupby
from operator import itemgetter

list(chain.from_iterable(islice(group, 1, None)
                         for key, group in groupby(inputlist, key=itemgetter(0))))
  • The groupby() call groups the input list into chunks where the first item is the same (itemgetter(0) is the grouping key).
  • The islice(group, 1, None) call turns the groups into iterables where the first element will be skipped.
  • The chain.from_iterable() call takes each islice() result and chains them together into a new iterable, which list() turns back into a list.

Demo:

>>> list(chain.from_iterable(islice(group, 1, None) for key, group in groupby(inputlist, key=itemgetter(0))))
[[0, 2], [0, 3], [0, 4], [1, 6], [1, 7], [2, 9]]
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a = [[0,1],
 [0,2],
 [0,3],
 [0,4],
 [1,5],
 [1,6],
 [1,7],
 [2,8],
 [2,9]]

a = [y for x in itertools.groupby(a, lambda x: x[0]) for y in list(x[1])[1:]]

print a
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My answer is :

from operator import itemgetter
sorted(l, key=itemgetter(1))  # fist sort by fist element of inner list 
nl = []
[[0, 1], [0, 2], [0, 3], [0, 4], [1, 5], [1, 6], [1, 7], [2, 8], [2, 9]]
j = 0;
for i in range(len(l)): 
    if(j == l[i][0]):
        j = j + 1   # skip element 
    else:
        nl.append(l[i])  # otherwise append  in new list

output is:

>>> nl
[[0, 2], [0, 3], [0, 4], [1, 6], [1, 7], [2, 9]]
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