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Is there any difference between?

def some_method
  some_instructions and return
end

and:

def some_method
  return some_instructions
end
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5  
You could have just tested this in the time it took you to write this question. codepad.org/1GHlfS5l –  Logan Serman Mar 29 '13 at 14:50
1  
Both methods have code smell because, in Ruby, return is implied at the end of a method, and Ruby automatically returns the value of the last operation. So, in both, simply use some_instructions as the last line before you close the method and you'll accomplish what you want. return is used when you want to force Ruby to return a value somewhere before the end of the method; If return has a parameter it will be returned, otherwise it defaults to nil. and return is code-smell and discouraged. See "Ruby Styleguide" for reasons why. –  the Tin Man Mar 29 '13 at 16:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is.

def some_method
  some_instructions and return
end

returns nil. UPDATE: As Arie Shaw pointed out and Jorg's answer is, if some_instructions is false (or nil), the method will return false (or nil) and will not run return

def some_method
  return some_instructions
end

returns the value returned by some_instructions

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1  
The first one may return false from some_instructions –  Arie Shaw Mar 29 '13 at 14:55
    
ah right. thanks! updated my answer. –  jvnill Mar 29 '13 at 15:00

Yes, there is: the first one returns nil if the return value of some_instructions is truthy and the return value of some_instructions if the return value of some_instructions is falsy. The second one always returns the return value of some_instructions.

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