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The . operator in the simplest form is used to index a list. How would you explain its use in english in this code?

if[x~"last";upd:{[t;x].[t;();,;r::select by sym from x]}]

I also don't understand the empty list and the :: operator in this line, but maybe they will make sense once the . is cleared up.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In plain english I would explain it as: modify the table t at all () indices by applying the append/comma function with the value r.

First consider a few simpler cases of @:

q)l:3 5 7 9
q)l:1.1 2.2 3.3
q)@[l; 0 2; +; 10]
11.1 2.2 13.3

q)d:`p`o`i!4.4 5.5 6.6
q)@[d; `p`i; -; 10]
p| -5.6
o| 5.5
i| -3.4

As you can see the format is @[dataStructure; indices; function; y-arg]

means to the dataStructure at indices apply the function with the given y-arguments. Notice for the list l the indices 0 2 meant index both 0 and 2 at the topmost level. There's no way using @ to index at depth. e.g. given matrix m:(1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9) how can we use this format to modify just the values 4 and 6?

q)/ @ indexes repeatedly at topmost level
q)/ definitely not what we want
q)@[m;(1;0 2);+;100]
101 102 103
104 105 106
107 108 109

q)/ **. indexes into the data structure**

q).[m;1 2;+;100]
1 2 3
4 5 106
7 8 9

q).[m;(1;0 2);+;100]
1   2 3
104 5 106
7   8 9

Lastly the empty list () is a short way of saying, apply to all indices:

q).[m;();+;100]
101 102 103
104 105 106
107 108 109
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. In this case means apply , to t and r. r is global updated on each call and contains last values recieved by sym. :: is assignment to global in most cases.

code.kx.com describe . function in great details

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I re-read the code.cx.com reference, I don't see how . can apply to t and r. The second usage in the code.cx reference page mentions functions of varying valence, but I don't see what kind of function t could be. And what's the use of the empty list '()' anyway? –  Robert Kubrick Mar 29 '13 at 21:17
    
You need to follow the "Functional Forms of Amend" link under "See Also" in the reference for "." –  pamphlet Jul 9 '14 at 17:18

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