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how may I select a different method based upon a Generic type?

Simply I have a class parametrized with a generic type and I have to select the correct PreparedStatement setter according to the T type:

Class CustomFieldsTypeManager<T> {
   ArrayList<T> data;

   public void setUpStatement(PreparedStatement st){
      ...
      if ( **T==String** ){
         st.setString(index, (String) data<T>.get(dt_index);
      } else if ( **T==Integer** ){
         st.setInt(index, (String) data<T>.get(dt_index);
      }
      ...
   }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're looking for instanceof:

if ( data.get(dt_index) instanceof String ) {
    //...
}
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Thank you very much! it works like a charm. –  Azathoth Mar 29 '13 at 17:06
    
@user2224731 please mark the post as the answer by clicking on the check below the rep. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 29 '13 at 17:07
    
The only caveat is with 'non object types' (such as int) whose belongs to Object so the type-check to Integer fails. The solution is to force cast to T the getter (data.get). [Maybe this info can help someone with the same issue in the future] –  Azathoth Mar 29 '13 at 17:14
    
@user2224731 A List<T> doesn't support int but Integer. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 29 '13 at 17:15
    
Yes I known, primitive types are not supported by generics –  Azathoth Mar 29 '13 at 17:44

Because of type erasure that information on generics is lost at runtime. You should try to exploit parametric polymorphism in a different way, by providing specialization of the classes:

class CustomFieldsTypeManager<T> {
   ArrayList<T> data;

   abstract void setUpStatement(PreparedStatement st);
}

class StringCustomFieldsTypeManager extends CustomFieldsTypeManager<String> {
   void setUpStatement(PreparedStatement st) {
     st.setString(index, data.get(dt_index)); // data it's already an ArrayList<String>
   }
}

There are also ways to check it at runtime but this kinda defeats the good points of generics an inheritance even if they're as safe as this solution (must they must be correctly written).

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I already solved using instanceof, thank you anyway. I like your design solution. Is very intresting –  Azathoth Mar 29 '13 at 17:25

You can't. But what you could do, is:

class CustomFieldsTypeManager<T> {
    private Class<T> type;
    public CustomFieldsTypeManager(Class<T> type) {
        this.type = type;
    }
}

Then:

CustomFieldsTypeManager<String> m = new CustomFieldsTypeManager<String>(String.class);

And finally:

public void setUpStatement(PreparedStatement st) {
    if (type.equals(String.class)){
        st.setString(index, (String) data<T>.get(dt_index);
    } else if (type.equals(Integer.class)){
        st.setInt(index, (String) data<T>.get(dt_index);
    }
}

Or, simply use the PreparedStatement#setObject method instead of the ones you're using.

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Gosh. I didn't noticed there where such a method... I've already solved with the instanceof ... but thanks anyway i'll remember for the future –  Azathoth Mar 29 '13 at 17:17

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