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Let's say i have list of Tanks,Airplanes and many other things that the to common thing they implement is IHaveLocation which is and abstract class and IHaveColor which is an interface.

I want to make a list of them because i need to query the list on the basis of this two interfaces.

How do i do it ?

  • I can make a list of objects and then write (obj as IHaveLocation) and use his methods, and (obj as IHaveColor) and use his methods. but this is very very ugly !
  • I can make a list of IhaveLocation and then i need to do only one as (obj as IHaveColor). But it's also terrible
  • I can create a new abstract class then inherits from both, but i'm trying to avoid it.

is there some trick to this ?

I Want to make something like List<IHaveLocation and IHaveColor>

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I mentioned in the comments of Reed's answer, you could use generic methods to allow you to add both Tank's and Airplane's. Something like this:

class TwoTypesList<T1, T2>
{
    List<Tuple<T1, T2>> m_list = new List<Tuple<T1,T2>>();

    public void Add<ConcreteT>(ConcreteT item) where ConcreteT : T1, T2
    {
        m_list.Add(Tuple.Create<T1, T2>(item, item));
    }
}

Then the usage would be:

        TwoTypesList<IHaveColor, IHaveLocation> list = new TwoTypesList<IHaveColor, IHaveLocation>();
        Airplane a = new Airplane();
        Tank t = new Tank();
        list.Add(a);
        list.Add(t);

The downside, of course, is that you're storing the object twice. If you don't like that, then of course you could change the internal storage of the list to be an object or only one of the interfaces.

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Note that you're storing a reference to the object twice, but the object itself only exists once, so this is generally unlikely to be a problem unless you have particularly large lists. –  Servy Mar 29 '13 at 18:49
    
@Servy, Yeah, just added an edit addressing that. But yeah, it's a good point to keep in mind. –  Matt Smith Mar 29 '13 at 18:53
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You can wrap this in a generic class with constraints on both types:

public class YourClass<T> where T : IHaveLocation, IHaveColor
{
    List<T> items = new List<T>;

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        items.Add(item);
    }
    // ...
}

Methods within this class can then use both interfaces as needed, as the type is guaranteed to implement them.

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Another option is to define an interface IHaveLocationAndColor that implements both interfaces. That won't force you to define a new class that encapsulates a standard List<T>. –  Timothy Shields Mar 29 '13 at 15:45
    
You could derive a new collection from Collection<T> and use similar type constraints. –  Olly Mar 29 '13 at 15:46
    
@TimothyShields The downside is that your classes have to implement that interface (IHaveLocationAndColor) instead of just implementing the original interfaces... –  Reed Copsey Mar 29 '13 at 15:46
    
@Olly Yes, that would effectively be the same - any generic class would work, or even use a generic method on a class. –  Reed Copsey Mar 29 '13 at 15:46
    
With this solution, wouldn't you have to be consistently adding an object with the same concrete type (i.e. if you had Class1 and Class2 that both implemented IHaveLocation and IHaveColor, then you couldn't add them both to the same YourClass object, right? –  Matt Smith Mar 29 '13 at 15:47
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you can try something like :

public class YourClass<T> where T : Ihavelocation, ihavecolor{
    List<T> items = new List<T>;

    public void Add(T item){
        items.Add(item);
    }

}
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