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I just start working with ruby tests and don't know how write code like in test. here is full task from test file:

require "temperature"

describe "temperature conversion functions" do
  describe "#ftoc" do
    it "converts freezing temperature" do
      ftoc(32).should == 0
    end

    it "converts boiling temperature" do
      ftoc(212).should == 100
    end

    it "converts body temperature" do
      ftoc(98.6).should == 37
    end

    it "converts arbitrary temperature" do
      ftoc(68).should == 20
    end
  end

  describe "#ctof" do
   it "converts freezing temperature" do
     ctof(0).should == 32
   end

   it "converts boiling temperature" do
     ctof(100).should == 212
   end

   it "converts arbitrary temperature" do
     ctof(20).should == 68
   end
  end
end

In my code file I try this:

def ftoc(f)
  (f - 32) / 1.8
end

And run it from rake command from terminal. Than rake says

temperature conversion functions
#ftoc
converts freezing temperature
converts boiling temperature
converts body temperature (FAILED - 1)
share|improve this question
    
which books you are referring to learn this? –  Arup Rakshit Mar 29 '13 at 15:55
1  
The output in console should be telling you what it expected to find and what it actually found. That should give you further clues on what's wrong. –  depa Mar 29 '13 at 16:05
    
ok, so how I should describe "#ftoc" in code ? –  John Oggy Mar 29 '13 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

I run this code without any problem

# controllers/temp_spec.rb
require 'spec_helper'

describe "#ftoc" do
  it "converts freezing temperature" do
    ftoc(32).should == 0
  end
end

def ftoc(f)
  (f - 32) / 1.8
end

# $ rspec spec/controllers/temp_spec.rb
# => One example, 0 failure

I also recommend you not to use ==, instead using eq. e.g. ftoc(32).should eq(0). Though that makes no difference in this case.

Update

I just saw your updated question. So your code is in separate file? How can Rspec know your code? That's the problem, if your code is not within a standard matching Rails file.

In your case you need to require the code file in spec, then either create a new instance of the class(if the methods are within class), or use module to expose the methods to global.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Bill. May I send it test file to your email box ? –  John Oggy Mar 29 '13 at 16:57
    
@JohnOggy, check my updated answer. –  Billy Chan Mar 29 '13 at 17:05
    
Thank's all for help. Sorry for my bad english. I found answer –  John Oggy Mar 29 '13 at 17:08
    
That's nice. It's always good to the community to update your question with your solution, if none of the answers could solve it. –  Billy Chan Mar 29 '13 at 17:12

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