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I have been struggling with array_search for a bit and although I think I understand it now, I just want to make absolutely sure I understand the logic behind the way my code is executing.

I am trying to write a function that will add an element to an array if it is not in the array to begin with, and remove it if it is. Simple, right?

$k = array_search($needle, $haystack)
if ( $k === FALSE ) {
    $haystack[] = $needle;
} else {
    unset($haystack[$k]);
}

Is this the most efficient way to write this? It seems like there should be a way to assign the value of $k and at the same time check whether its value is FALSE or anything else (including 0)?

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Looks good apart from the missing ; on first line –  Hanky 웃 Panky Mar 29 '13 at 16:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can shorten your code this way:

if (($k = array_search($needle, $haystack)) === FALSE) {
    $haystack[] = $needle;
} else {
    unset($haystack[$k]);
}

The first line of code performs the search, stores the returned value in $k, and checks if this value is exactly equal to FALSE or not.

Documentation: array_search

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1  
@cpattersonv1 $k is always set. Either with false if $needle is not found, or with a key value to indicate where to find $needle in $haystack array. Check the manual page for array_search for more information. –  Jocelyn Mar 29 '13 at 16:31
    
@cpattersonv1 The parentheses are there for a good reason. I don't see why you would want to remove them. –  Jocelyn Mar 29 '13 at 17:01

Your code is fine but you can do it this way:-

if (($k = array_search($needle, $haystack)) == FALSE) 
{
$haystack[] = $needle;
} 
else 
{
unset($haystack[$k]);
}
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You posted exactly the same code I posted earlier... –  Jocelyn Mar 29 '13 at 16:54
    
No he's missing the triple equals sign. This won't work if the matched element has a key of 0. –  caseyy Mar 30 '13 at 16:44

Outside of wrapping it with a function so you can reuse it, what you have works well. Most of the other examples are just rewriting what you've written already.

<?php
$haystack = array(
'5','6','7',
);

$needles = array('3','4','2','7');
print_r($haystack);


function checker($needle,$haystack){
    $k = array_search($needle, $haystack);
    if ( $k === FALSE ) {
        $haystack[] = $needle;
    } else {
        unset($haystack[$k]);
    }
    return $haystack;
}


foreach($needles as $value){
    $haystack = checker($value,$haystack);
    print_r($haystack);

}



?>
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