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I work binary numbers and I try to find two strings that between just one difference in a array. For example

string[]binary = {"{0000}","{0001}","{0111}"};

just fourth char is different for first and second element and I should show that, so how can I find them? Is there any efficient method in C#? Thanks..

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1  
    
are you only comparing two nibbles or all three? do you just want which bits are different between the compared nibbles? – d.moncada Mar 29 '13 at 17:13
    
Any particular reason you care about performance and represent numbers as string? And what performance you are looking for - O(n^2 *m) (n - number of elements, m length of the values) is trivial... – Alexei Levenkov Mar 29 '13 at 17:23
    
Performance isn't important, I just find dual strings that between just one different char in a array @AlexeiLevenkov – Nevra Aydın Mar 29 '13 at 17:35
    
no, it's changable but I don't care which bits are different, I need to these strings @moncadad – Nevra Aydın Mar 29 '13 at 17:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

What about this, which finds all the couple of binary numbers with one different bit:

class Program {
    static void Main( string[ ] args ) {
        string[] binary = { "{0000}", "{0001}", "{0111}" };
        var differentNumbers = DifferentNumbers( binary );

        foreach ( Tuple<string, string, int> tuple in differentNumbers )
            Console.WriteLine( string.Format( "{0} ; {1} - index {2}", tuple.Item1, tuple.Item2, tuple.Item3 ) );
    }

    public static List<Tuple<string, string, int>> DifferentNumbers( string[ ] array ) {
        var differentNumbers = new List<Tuple<string, string, int>>( );

        for ( int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++ ) {
            for ( int j = i + 1; j < array.Length; j++ ) {

                int count = 0, index = 0;
                for ( int c = 1; c < array[ i ].Length - 1; c++ ) {
                    if ( array[ i ][ c ] != array[ j ][ c ] ) {
                        index = c;
                        if ( count++ > 1 )
                            break;
                    }
                }

                if ( count == 1 )
                    differentNumbers.Add( new Tuple<string, string, int>( array[ i ], array[ j ], index ) );
            }
        }

        return differentNumbers;
    }
}

Results:

{0000} ; {0001} - index 4

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it works, and also I understand what it is, thank you so much. – Nevra Aydın Mar 29 '13 at 18:31

This may helps:

public static int StringDistance(string first, string second)
{
    int result = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < first.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!first[i].Equals(second[i]))
        {
            result++;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

And you can use it this way:

string[] binary = { "{0000}", "{0001}", "{0111}" };
var result = binary.Where(input => binary.Any(i => StringDistance(i, input) == 1)).ToArray();
//output: {"0000", "0001"}
share|improve this answer
    
+0. Correct, but obviously not anywhere "efficient" method to find if strings are different in single character. – Alexei Levenkov Mar 29 '13 at 18:36
    
@AlexeiLevenkov You are right. But if you read the comments you'll see the efficiency was not the case. Anyway I made an edit. – Hossein Narimani Rad Mar 29 '13 at 18:37
    
+1 for at least removing completely unnecessary converting string to array... – Alexei Levenkov Mar 29 '13 at 18:47
    
@AlexeiLevenkov Thanks. I wonder if there is a way to write the StringDistance function with LINQ. Is it possible? – Hossein Narimani Rad Mar 29 '13 at 18:51
1  
Zip + Where + Count: first.Zip(second, (f,s)=> new {f,s}).Where(i => i.f!=i.s).Count() or better indexed version of Where: first.Where((c,i) => c != second[i]).Count(). – Alexei Levenkov Mar 29 '13 at 19:29

Iterates through each string once to convert to UInt64, then can be used multiple times very efficiently to test against one another:

    static private void TestCheckFor1BitDiff()
    {
        string[] values = new string[]
        {
            "0000",
            "0001",
            "0111",
            "1000",
            "1111"
        };

        UInt64[] intValues = values.Select(v => ConvertBinaryToUInt64(v)).ToArray();

        bool comp01 = CheckFor1BitDiff(intValues[0], intValues[1]); // true
        bool comp02 = CheckFor1BitDiff(intValues[0], intValues[2]); // false
        bool comp12 = CheckFor1BitDiff(intValues[1], intValues[2]); // false
        bool comp03 = CheckFor1BitDiff(intValues[0], intValues[3]); // true
        bool comp24 = CheckFor1BitDiff(intValues[2], intValues[4]); // true
    }

    private static UInt64 ConvertBinaryToUInt64(string value)
    {
        if (64 < value.Length)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("exceeds 64 bits", "value");
        }

        UInt64 power = 1;
        UInt64 retVal = 0;

        foreach (char bit in value.ToArray().Reverse())
        {
            switch (bit)
            {
                case '1':
                    retVal += power;
                    break;
                case '0':
                    break;
                default:
                    throw new ArgumentException("contains characters other than 0 and 1", "value");
            }

            power *= 2;
        }

        return retVal;
    }

    static private bool CheckFor1BitDiff(string a, string b )
    {
        UInt64 a1 = ConvertBinaryToUInt64(a);
        UInt64 b1 = ConvertBinaryToUInt64(b);

        return CheckFor1BitDiff(a1, b1 );
    }

    static private bool CheckFor1BitDiff(UInt64 a, UInt64 b )
    {
        return IsPowerOfTwo( a ^ b );
    }

    static private bool IsPowerOfTwo(UInt64 value)
    {
        return (value & (value - 1)) == 0;
    }
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