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I am currently learning C++ and having some problems understanding on how to give values to the constructor. Got my exercise working but am not sure which way is smartest/best. Way nr. 1

class Vector2d{

public:
Vector2d(double x, double y):x(x),
y(y)
{

}

and way nr.2

class Vector2d{

public:
void set_values (double,double);
Vector2d()
{

}

void Vector2d::set_values (double a, double b) {
  x = a;
  y = b;
}

Found both ways by reading some tutorials and both ways are working. I guess the first one is more efficient as I don´t have to write a new void, but I am not exactly sure what

:x(x),
y(y)

is doing/meaning.

Thanks a lot in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
:X(x), y(y) is called "member list initialization". Basically it's doing this.x = x and this.y = y. –  Porkbutts Mar 29 '13 at 17:03
    
The latter gives no values to the constructor (the members are default-initialized), so I would say it hardly qualifies as any way, much less a better way. –  WhozCraig Mar 29 '13 at 17:03
    
possible duplicate of What is this weird colon-member syntax in the constructor? –  FredOverflow Mar 29 '13 at 17:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Constructor with parameter is created to initialize the member attributes of the class (your 1st solution) and it is different from default constructor (with no parameters - constructor in your 2nd solution).

In your second solution, you are using a setter (a member function to set the values of member attributes) which we can call anytime we need to set the values but with the constructor with parameters (1st solution), we can only set the values for the first time when we create an object to that class.

For example;

when we create the object;

Vector2d vec2d(2.3, 4.5);

it will set the values of x and y to 2.3 and 4.5 respectively but what will we do if we need to set the values again in the program? We will then use setter function like;

vec2d.set_values(5.0, 7.8);

so in short, we only use what we need according to our scenario. If we don't want to set the values again then constructor with parameters (your 1st solution) is the best.

We do the following

:x(x),
y(y)

to assign the value of x and y coming through parameters in constructor to the class members x and y. It is the same as;

class Vector2d{

public:
  Vector2d(double x, double y)
  {
    //"this" pointer is used to differentiate the variables
    this->x = x;
    this->y = y;
  }
}

or for the simplicity I would suggest to use different names if you don't know about this pointer yet;

class Vector2d{

public:
  Vector2d(double a, double b)
  {
    x = a;
    y = b;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! Very good example - got it now :-) –  user1204121 Mar 29 '13 at 17:16
    
you're welcome :) –  nommyravian Mar 29 '13 at 17:18
1  
Although by doing : x(x), y(y) the resultant assembly will be more efficient instead of assignment inside the constructor function. Although in reality that probably doesn't matter much. –  spartacus Mar 29 '13 at 17:19

In C++ doing it by saying

:x(x),
y(y)

You will actually save instructions when it is compiled. The compiler will actually initialize those variables directly inline when space is made for the class.

So I would say that way is better.

share|improve this answer

I am not exactly sure what [code...] is doing/meaning.

They are initializing your member variables.

It's probably confusing because your constructor parameters were given the same names. Consider this equivalent:

Vector2d(double x_param, double y_param)
  : x(x_param)  // initialize member variable "x"
  , y(y_param)  // initialize member variable "y"
{

}

It's reasonable for your class to have both this constructor, and the set_values function to change the values after construction.

share|improve this answer

with #1 you are instructing the program to initialize x,y by calling their constructor

with #2 you are calling operator= to overwrite the value of x,y by: the value obatained by calling the two constructors: x.operator=(double(right_value))

doesn't differ much since the type involved is "double", would be much different with some complex classes i guess

share|improve this answer

First way is calling the constructor to initialize members; second way is calling member function to change the value of member variables by assigning, since you only define default constructor, initially members are initialized with default value, then if you call the set_values function, they are reassigned inside that function body. In the current example, they will have the same effect. But it is usually better to initialize member variables at the constructor's initializer list. Your second way looks like a setter function. You cannot use the second way to initialize class member variables since it is not static.

It is preferrable to use the first way if you are constructing an object. Using the initializer list, the members are created and initialized only once, with the given value.

share|improve this answer

If you will use separate function to initialize your object, than between constructor call and initialization, your object will be in unitialized state.

The only case you need it - when really know what are you doing.

And also initializing in constructor is faster. When you write

my_class()
: field_(value)
{
}

your field initialized by copying value into it. In other case it initialized, when copied, which is overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
The members will be default-initialied if not specified in the initializer list of a constructor (C++11 § 8.5,p6). What that means depends entirely on the type of the member. –  WhozCraig Mar 29 '13 at 17:05
    
@WhozCraig I meant the high-level state of object, it invariants. If instead of constructors, someone will always initialize with function, than possible to break invariants befor initialization –  kassak Mar 29 '13 at 17:15

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