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few days ago, I started to get familiar with C++11, espacially with the new pointer management concepts like shared/unique_ptr.

What I want to do is to write a small Manager/Handler class. A Manager distributes and manages Handles. Such a handle could be for example a simple filehandle. If a consumer wants to get a handle which already exists, the manager simply returns a shared_ptr. If the handle does not exist, the manager creates a new handle and then returns the shared_ptr.

Inside the Manager, those shared_ptr's are stored in a simple STL-Map. If the last shared_ptr, which was assigned gets deleted, i want my manager to remove the related map-element, so that the handler object automatically gets destructed.

This sounds a bit like garbage-collection(e.g. worker thread, which checks the usage count of the pointers), but I am sure, that it should be possible to design it a bit more handsome.

In C++11, is there also a clever way to pass a reference of the manager instance to the handler object? (e.g. sth. like passing a unique_ptr(this) to the constructor of a new handler)

Any suggestions?

Thanks a lot!

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

/*
 * Simple handler class, that actually does nothing.
 * This could be e.g. a Filehandler class or sth. like that
 */
class Handler {
private:
    int i;
public:
    Handler(int i) :i(i) {}
    ~Handler() {}
    // Say who you are.
    void print(void) { cout << "I am handler # " << i << endl; }
};

/*
 * This is the "manager" class, that manages all handles. A handle is identified
 * by an integer value. If a handle already exists, the Manager returns a shared_ptr,
 * if it does not exist, the manager creates a new handle.
 */
class Manager {
private:
    map<int, shared_ptr<Handler> > handles;
public:
    Manager() {}
    ~Manager() {}

    shared_ptr<Handler> get_handler(int identifier) {
        shared_ptr<Handler> retval;
        auto it = handles.find(identifier);

        if(it != handles.end() ) {
            retval = it->second;
        } else {
            retval = shared_ptr<Handler>(new Handler(identifier));
            handles.insert( pair<int, shared_ptr<Handler>>(identifier, retval) );
        }

        return retval;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    Manager m;

    // Handler 13 doesn't exist, so it gets allocated
    auto h = m.get_handler(13);
    // Manager knows about handler 13, so it returns the already existing shared_ptr
    auto i = m.get_handler(13);

    h.reset(); // Well... Let's assume we don't need h any more...
    // do some stuff...
    i->print();
    // ...
    i.reset(); // We also loose i. This is exactly the point where i want the manager to forget about the handle 13

    return 0;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may want to hold non-owning pointers in your manager to keep track of existing handles, and give away owning shared_ptr with a custom deleter. The custom deleter would make sure the corresponding observing pointer in the manager is removed when the object eventually gets destroyed.

I called this pattern Tracking Factory, and here is how it works. Given an object class (would be Handler in your case):

class object
{

public:

    size_t get_id() const
    {
        return _id;
    }

private:

    friend class tracking_factory;

    object(size_t id) : _id(id) { }

    size_t _id = static_cast<size_t>(-1);

};

I define a class which creates instances of object and stores non-owning references (weak_ptrs) to them. This class is the only class through which instances of object can be created - this is why the constructor of object is private, and tracking_factory is declared as friend in order to be able to access it:

class tracking_factory
{

public:

    std::shared_ptr<object> get_object(size_t id, 
                                       bool createIfNotFound = true)
    {
        auto i = std::find_if(
            begin(_objects),
            end(_objects),
            [id] (std::pair<size_t const, std::weak_ptr<object>> const& p) 
            -> bool
        {
            return (p.first == id);
        });

        if (i != end(_objects))
        {
            return i->second.lock();
        }
        else if (createIfNotFound)
        {
            return make_object(id);
        }
        else
        {
            return std::shared_ptr<object>();
        }
    }

    size_t count_instances() const
    {
        return _objects.size();
    }

private:

    std::shared_ptr<object> make_object(size_t id)
    {
        std::shared_ptr<object> sp(
            new object(id),
            [this, id] (object* p)
        {
            _objects.erase(id);
            delete p;
        });

        _objects[id] = sp;

        return sp;
    }

    std::map<size_t, std::weak_ptr<object>> _objects;

};

Then, the rest of program will obtain shared_ptrs to objects through the object_factory: if an object with the desired characteristics (an id member here) has been created already, a shared_ptr to it will be returned without a new object being instantiated. Here is some code to test the functionality:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    tracking_factory f;

    auto print_object_count = [&f] ()
    {
        std::cout << "Number of objects: " << f.count_instances() << std::endl;
    };

    print_object_count();

    auto p1 = f.get_object(42);

    print_object_count();

    {
        auto p2 = f.get_object(42);

        print_object_count();

        p1 = f.get_object(0);

        print_object_count();
    }

    print_object_count();

    p1.reset();

    print_object_count();
}

Finally, here is a live example.

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This is exactly what i was looking for! Thanks a lot! –  rralf Mar 29 '13 at 17:39
    
@rralf: You're welcome :) If this solves your problem, please consider marking the answer as accepted (or any other answer you may prefer). –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 17:40
    
Hmm, valgrind tells me, that your example is leaking somewhere, but I don't get out, where it leaks exactly... –  rralf Mar 29 '13 at 18:01
    
@rralf: That's strange... the object count is 0 before the program exits (see the live example), so all the references must have been released. Is it possible that you are introducing some shared_ptr cycles between your objects? –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 18:07
1  
I think your custom deleter neglects to live up to it's name. –  Andrew Durward Mar 29 '13 at 19:08
show 5 more comments

Store std::weak_ptr objects in the map; they don't retain ownership, so when the last std::shared_ptr object goes away the resource will be destroyed. But they do keep track of whether there are any remaining std::shared_ptr objects that point to the original object, so putting them in the map lets you check later whether there is still a resource there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! But then, i would have 'dead' expired weak pointers inside my map. That's not fatal, because i can recognize them.. Is there a clever way of storing a reference of the Manager class inside the Handler class? Then I could force call a collect-garbage function inside the manager, each time a handler gets destroyed. –  rralf Mar 29 '13 at 17:28
    
@rralf: You do not need garbage collection. If you want to avoid keeping the expired weak pointers, you can use a custom deleter that removes them upon destruction. I've described this in my answer. –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 17:33
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