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tl;dr

My question: Within an R session, is there some way to use knitr's cached results to 'fast-forward' to the environment (i.e. the set of objects) available in a given code block, in the same sense that knit() itself does?


Setup:

knitr's built-in cacheing of code chunks is one of its killer features.

It's especially helpful when some chunks contain time-consuming computations. Unless they (or a chunk they depend on) is altered, the computations only need be carried out the first time the document is knited: upon all subsequent calls to knit, the objects created by the chunk will just be loaded from the cache.

Here's a minimal-ish example, a file called "lotsOfComps.Rnw":

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}

The calculations in this chunk take a looooong time.

<<slowChunk, cache=TRUE>>=
Sys.sleep(30)  ## Stands in for some time-consuming computation
x <- sample(1:10, size=2)
@

I wish I could `fast-forward' to this chunk, to view the cached value of 
\texttt{x}

<<interestingChunk>>=
y <- prod(x)^2
y
@

\end{document}

Times needed to knit and TeXify "lotsOfComps.Rnw":

## First time
system.time(knit2pdf("lotsOfComps.Rnw"))
##   user  system elapsed
##   0.07    0.02   31.81

## Second (and subsequent) runs
system.time(knit2pdf("lotsOfComps.Rnw"))
##   user  system elapsed
##   0.03    0.02    1.28

My question:

Within an R session, is there some way to use knitr's cached results to 'fast-forward' to the environment (i.e. the set of objects) available in a given code block, in the same sense that knit() itself does?


Doing purl("lotsOfComps.Rnw") and then running the code in "lotsOfComps.R" doesn't work, because all of the objects along the way must be recomputed.

Ideally, it would be possible to do something like this to end up in the environment that exists at the beginning of <<interestingChunk>>=:

spin("lotsOfComps.Rnw", chunk="interestingChunk")
ls()
# [1] "x"
x
# [1] 3 8

Since spin() is not (yet?) available, what's the best way to get the equivalent result?

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2  
Good question. Barry Rowlingson asked me a similar question last year, and my own solution was hidden deep here (it even took me a while to dig it out): gist.github.com/yihui/2629886#file-knitr-checkpoint-rnw I'm going to leave it to other people to "port" it here if it is useful :) –  Yihui Mar 30 '13 at 4:43
    
@Yihui -- Thanks for taking the time to look that up. It's very useful, and I'm planning to incorporate it in an answer to this question once I get a chance. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 30 '13 at 23:41
    
@Yihui -- I'm having a heck of a time getting the environment of the checkpoint chunk dumped/saved into the global environment so that it's available after knit() has run. trace(knit, quote(on.exit({assign("ChunkEnv", envir, envir = .GlobalEnv)}))) is the closest I've gotten, but it seems to save the environment of the final chunk no matter which one I set as the checkpoint. It's looking like I'll have to delve a lot deeper into knitr's code before I can crack this nut. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 31 '13 at 5:44
    
Why do you need that environment since all its objects are available in .GlobalEnv? –  Yihui Mar 31 '13 at 6:24
    
@Yihui - Well, I'm experiencing unexpected results when kniting your "knitr-checkpoint.Rnw". First time I do knit("knitr-checkpoint.Rnw"); ls(), only x is in .GlobalEnv. All's well. Second and further times I do knit("knitr-checkpoint.Rnw"), though, it ignores the checkpoint and runs all of the chunks. ls() then shows both x and y in the .GlobalEnv. My only workaround so far is to reset to checkpoint = 'example-a', knit() it, then reset to checkpoint = 'example-b' and knit(). It's then good again, but only ever for one run without changing the checkpoint. Baffling! –  Josh O'Brien Mar 31 '13 at 13:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+150

Here is one solution, which is still a little bit awkward but it works. The idea is to add a chunk option named mute which takes NULL by default, but it can also take an R expression, e.g. mute_later() below. When knitr evaluates the chunk options, mute_later() can be evaluated and NULL is returned; at the same time, there are side effects in opts_chunk (setting the global chunk options like eval = FALSE).

Now what you need to do is to put mute=mute_later() in the chunk after which you want to skip the rest of the chunks, e.g. you can move this option from example-a to example-b. Because mute_later() returns NULL which happens to be the default value of the mute options, the cache will not be broken even you move this option around.

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}

<<setup, include=FALSE, cache=FALSE>>=
rm(list = ls(all.names = TRUE), envir = globalenv())
opts_chunk$set(cache = TRUE) # enable cache to make it faster
opts_chunk$set(eval = TRUE, echo = TRUE, include = TRUE)

# set global options to mute later chunks
mute_later = function() {
  opts_chunk$set(cache = FALSE, eval = FALSE, echo = FALSE, include = FALSE)
  NULL
}
# a global option mute=NULL so that using mute_later() will not break cache
opts_chunk$set(mute = NULL)
@

<<example-a, mute=mute_later()>>=
x = rnorm(4)
Sys.sleep(5)
@

<<example-b>>=
y = rpois(10,5)
Sys.sleep(5)
@

<<example-c>>=
z = 1:10
Sys.sleep(3)
@

\end{document}

It is awkward in the sense that you have to cut-and-paste , mute=mute_later() around. Ideally you should just set the chunk label like the gist I wrote for Barry.

The reason that my original gist did not work is because chunk hooks are ignored when a chunk is cached. The second time you knit() the file, the chunk hook checkpoint for example-a was skipped, therefore eval=TRUE for the rest of chunks, and you saw all chunks were evaluated. By comparison, chunk options are always dynamically evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
Setting mute=NULL and having mute_later() return NULL to avoid breaking the cache is genius. Great stuff. Thanks! –  Josh O'Brien Apr 4 '13 at 5:33
    
I suppose one could also create a function checkpoint() which is like mute_later() except that it tests whether options$label == checkpoint and only mutes subsequent chunks it that's TRUE. Then, putting mute = checkpoint() in selected chunk headers, one could select which of them to process up to by changing the value of checkpoint in the preamble. (Could even pass the value in prior to doing knit() by attaching it at the second position in the search path, though that gets ugly(er) fast). In any case, thanks again. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 4 '13 at 17:20
    
@JoshO'Brien the problem is you do not have access to the current chunk label in mute_later() (neither is options available); there is opts_current$get('label'), but it is one step lagging behind; this is an ugly fact in knitr, and I'll have to think about it. –  Yihui Apr 4 '13 at 19:40
    
Foiled again! In all seriousness, though, for my own real use cases, the solution you've provided is perfect. This is way way way better than having to manually wrap each of my checkpoints in if(file.exists(f <- "filename.Rdata")) {load(f)} else {.......}, as I sometimes did in the past. Thanks once again for the thought you put into this. –  Josh O'Brien Apr 5 '13 at 3:38

This has to be one of the ugliest kludges I've written in a while...

The basic idea is to scan the .Rnw file for chunks, extract their names, detect which ones are cached, then determine which ones need to be loaded. Once we do that we scan step by step grab each chunk name that needs be loaded, detect the database name from the cache folder, and load it using lazyLoad. After we load all the chunks we need to force evaluation. Ugly and I'm sure there are a few errors but it seems to work on the simple example you gave and some other minimal examples I created. This makes the assumption that the .Rnw file is in the current working directory...

load_cache_until <- function(file, chunk, envir = parent.frame()){
    require(knitr)

    # kludge to detect chunk names, which come before the chunk of
    # interest, and which are cached... there has to be a nicer way...
    text <- readLines(file)
    chunks <- grep("^<<.*>>=", text, value = T)
    chunknames <- gsub("^<<([^,>]*)[,>]*.*", "\\1", chunks)
    #detect unnamed chunks
    tmp <- grep("^\\s*$", chunknames)
    chunknames[tmp] <- paste0("unnamed-chunk-", seq_along(tmp))
    id <- which(chunk == chunknames)
    previouschunks <- chunknames[seq_len(id - 1)]
    cachedchunks <- chunknames[grep("cache\\s*=\\s*T", chunks)]

    # These are the names of the chunks we want to load
    extractchunks <- cachedchunks[cachedchunks %in% previouschunks]

    oldls <- ls(envir, all = TRUE)
    # For each chunk...
    for(ch in extractchunks){   
        # Detect the file name of the database...
        pat <- paste0("^", ch, ".*\\.rdb")
        val <- gsub(".rdb", "", dir("cache", pattern = pat))
        # Lazy load the database
        lazyLoad(file.path("cache", val), envir = envir)
    }
    # Detect the new objects added
    newls <- ls(envir, all = TRUE)
    # Force evaluation...  There is probably a better way
    # to do this too...
    lapply(setdiff(newls, oldls), get)

    invisible()

}

load_cache_until("lotsOfComps.Rnw", "interestingChunk")

Making the code more robust is left as an exercise for the reader.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea, and I'll have a look at it when I'm back on an R-capable computer. Any idea how this will fare if one or more of the object-computing chunks are unnamed? –  Josh O'Brien Mar 29 '13 at 19:30
    
My guess is that it won't quite work right unless a named chunk operates on the variable of interest after the unnamed one does. I'm guessing it would be possible to account for unnamed chunks but the code as is doesn't do anything with unnamed chunks or inline code. –  Dason Mar 29 '13 at 19:50
    
Ok I added some code that detects unnamed chunks and loads those too. –  Dason Mar 29 '13 at 20:00
    
+1 This is a valiant effort, but I think the whole approach might be too fragile. e.g. my first trial with it included a chunk with header <<cache=TRUE>>=, which breaks the function. Also, I typically include document sections using child= directives like this <<child-1, child="1-Make-Figures.Rnw", eval=TRUE>>=, which will prob. also break this code. My guess is that code that piggy-backs on that used by knit() will be more successful. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 29 '13 at 20:53
1  
@JoshO'Brien Oh it's definitely kludgy and very fragile. Then again if you're willing to add code that saves the entire workspace to .Rdata in the chunk of interest that seems a little too much like the purl suggestion that you already ruled out to me. I'm personally waiting to see if Yihui comes and comments on this... –  Dason Mar 29 '13 at 21:01

Yihui points to a gist that comes close to doing exactly what I asked for.

In response to a question from Barry Rowlingson (aka Spacedman), Yihui constructed a 'checkpoint' hook that lets the user set the name of the last chunk that will be processed by a call to knit. To process chunks up through one named example-a, simply do opts_chunk$set(checkpoint = 'example-a') somewhere in an initial 'setup' chunk.

The solution works beautifully --- the first time it is run with a given checkpoint. The second and subsequent times, unfortunately, knit seemingly ignores the checkpoint and processes all of the chunks. (I discuss a workaround below, but it's not ideal).

Here is a slightly abridged version of Yihui's gist:

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}

<<setup, include=FALSE>>=
rm(list = ls(all.names = TRUE), envir = globalenv())
opts_chunk$set(cache = TRUE) # enable cache to make it faster
opts_chunk$set(eval = TRUE, echo = TRUE, include = TRUE)

# Define hook that will skip all chunks after the one named in checkpoint
knit_hooks$set(checkpoint = function(before, options, envir) {
if (!before && options$label == options$checkpoint) {
opts_chunk$set(cache = FALSE, eval = FALSE, echo = FALSE, include = FALSE)
}
})

## Set the checkpoint
opts_chunk$set(checkpoint = 'example-a') # restore objects up to example-a
@

<<example-a>>=
x = rnorm(4)
@

<<example-b>>=
y = rpois(10,5)
@

<<example-c>>=
z = 1:10
@

\end{document}

Because checkpoint="example-a", the script above should run through the second chunk, and then suppress all further chunks, including the ones that creates y and z. Let's try that a couple of times to see what happens:

library(knitr)

## First time, works like a charm
knit("checkpoint.Rnw")
ls()
[1] "x"

## Second time, Oops!, runs right past the checkpoint
knit("checkpoint.Rnw")
ls()
[1] "x" "y" "z"

The workaround I mentioned above is, after the first run-through, to

  1. Edit checkpoint.Rnw to set another checkpoint (by doing, e.g., opts_chunk$set(checkpoint = 'example-b'))
  2. Run knit("checkpoint.Rnw"),
  3. Edit checkpoint.Rnw to set the checkpoint back to 'example-a, (by doing, opts_chunk$set(checkpoint = 'example-a'))
  4. Run knit("checkpoint.Rnw) once more. This will once again process all chunks up to but not beyond example-a.

This can be much faster than recomputing all objects in the chunks, so it's good to know about, even if it's not ideal.

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I think I understand what is going on now. I'm trying to figure out a solution. –  Yihui Apr 4 '13 at 1:33
    
@Yihui -- That's awesome news. I'll be fascinated to learn what's going on, and just wish I could be more help! –  Josh O'Brien Apr 4 '13 at 2:10

They're just like any data file produced by save. If you grab the knitr-cache exampe from it's new location, it's just:

> library(knitr)
> knit("./005-latex.Rtex")
> load("cache/latex-my-cache_d9835aca7e54429f59d22eeb251c8b29.RData")
> ls()
 [1] "x"
share|improve this answer
2  
Try loading the .RData from a clean R session. It doesn't work. You're only getting "x" because you ran knit in that session. –  Dason Mar 29 '13 at 19:07

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