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Ok, this example is pretty straight-forward for the concept I'm trying to understand. I'll just show you the code:

class Base
{
protected:
    string name;
public:
    virtual string getName() const { return this->name; }
    virtual void setName(string name) { this->name = name; }
....
}

class Derived : public Base
{
private:
    double price;
....
}

main(int argc, char** argv)
{

    Base* base = new Base("Base Class");
    Derived* derived = new Derived(base, 453.21);
    derived->setName("Name changed!");

    cout << "Name of instance: " << base->getName() << endl;

    // Desired effect
        Output: 'Name changed!'
    // Actual effect
        Output: 'Base Class'
....
}

The issue for me is this. I want to create an instance of derived class with reference to already created instance of base class, so when I change any member variable of base class trough the derived instance, I can see the change on previously created base instance in the way demonstrated above.

Note: I hope that you will manage to comprehend what I meant, as I am aware that my terminology is probably little off. Please, don't be harsh. :)

Note: I won't be showing / writing constructors, since I am not sure what is the best way to do this, if even any exists and the syntax may be incorrect.

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1  
Please post all the relevant code, e.g., getName and setName. –  Daniel Frey Mar 29 '13 at 17:30
2  
I think you're misunderstanding the concept of inheritance. You do not need to create two separate objects of type Base and Derived. You create one object of type Derived and that automatically contains a base sub-object of type Base –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 17:35
1  
@AndyProwl No, I understand that. I was just curious if it is possible to still access this sub-object of Base somehow (trough the pointer). This way, more derived instances could share identical sub-object of this Base type. Not sure of practical applications of this, though. –  user1344799 Mar 29 '13 at 17:45
2  
I still believe you are misunderstanding inheritance. Each instance has its own subobject, and there is no implicit sharing - if there were, you couldn't have any two different instances of Derived with its own data members and everything would be shared, which makes little sense. If you need sharing, use (smart) pointers to create associations between classes. –  Andy Prowl Mar 29 '13 at 17:47
    
Sorry for late reply, I was internetless. Also, I would really like to thank you for your insight as well as your time. I realize some if not all questions or thoughts seem to make little sense in real code. However, as I said before, my intent with given syntax was purely to learn mechanics 'under the rug'. That being said, your statement conceived new question- is it not possible for two different Derived instances to share same, or rather identical subobject(Base), while not sharing other data members? I do know this is possible with aggregation but that's not inheritance. –  user1344799 Mar 31 '13 at 14:41

2 Answers 2

This seems to indicate the problem:

Base* base = new Base("Base Class");
Derived* derived = new Derived(base, 453.21);

as it is usually not necessary to construct the Base class separatly. Your derived class will already contain a Base instance implicitly, you don't have to add a pointer to one manually and set it from the ctor. I don't know how your ctor looks, but it should look like this:

Derived(const std::string& name, double p) : Base(name), price( p ) {}

If this enough to fix it yourself, good, otherwise post all the code of your example. Instead of the two lines from your code that I quoted above, it should look more like:

Derived* derived = new Derived("Base Class", 453.21);

If you post the code of Derived, it should be obvious for us and it will be much easier to explain it to you on your concrete example.

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The way you are trying to do is weird, but you can simply use inheritance concept like this code:

class Base
{
public:
    Base(const string &name) : name(name) {}
    virtual void setName(const string &name) { this->name = name; }
    virtual string getName() const { return name; }
protected:
    string name;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived(const string &name, double price) : Base(name), price(price) {}
private:
    double price;
};

int main()
{
    Derived* derived = new Derived("Base Class", 453.21);

    derived->setName("Name changed!");

    Base *base = derived;

    cout << "Name of instance: " << base->getName() << endl;
}

Output

Name of instance: Name changed!

You don't need a create Base object and pass it to the derived object.

Instead, create a derived object and pass its address to a Base pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answer. I initially asked AndyProwl but he didn't reply, so I would kindly ask you, M M., if you could take a second and elaborate this to me. Actually, this title gives hint to what I am trying to accomplish, as well as following question posted to Andy. Is it not possible for two different Derived instances to share same, or rather identical subobject(Base), while not sharing other data members? I do know this is possible with aggregation but that's not what I'm testing. –  user1344799 Apr 5 '13 at 20:25

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