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My question is probably very simple but I can't figure out a way to make this operation faster

  print a[(b==c[i]) for i in arange(0,len(c))]

where a,b and c are three numpy arrays. I'm dealing with arrays with millions of entry and the piece of code above is the bottleneck of my program.

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1  
To answer this with anything better than a guess we'd need at least the shape of a,b,c -- vectors, matrices, etc. –  jedwards Mar 29 '13 at 17:41
    
a,b,c are 1D arrays –  Matteo Mar 29 '13 at 17:43
1  
Your code results in a syntax error. Could you show a small working example of the code that is slow? –  Warren Weckesser Mar 29 '13 at 19:46
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you trying to get the values of a where b==c?

If so, you can just do a[b==c]:

from numpy import *

a = arange(11)
b = 11*a
c = b[::-1]

print a        # [  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10]
print b        # [  0  11  22  33  44  55  66  77  88  99 110]
print c        # [110  99  88  77  66  55  44  33  22  11   0]
print a[b==c]  # [5]
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thanks for the answer but that's not exactly what I'm looking for. In your example I would like the result to be [10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0] because these are the values of a where b=c –  Matteo Mar 29 '13 at 17:57
1  
@Matteo: What if b[j]==c[i] for multiple values of i or j? –  tom10 Mar 29 '13 at 18:18
    
Let's assume there are no repetitions. Sorry, my question wasn't very detailed. –  Matteo Mar 29 '13 at 18:30
1  
@Matteo: then edit your question and say exactly what are you trying to do, besides showing us the code. –  Cristian Ciupitu Mar 29 '13 at 20:27
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You should probably look into broadcasting. I assume you are looking for something like the following?

>>> b=np.arange(5)
>>> c=np.arange(6).reshape(-1,1)
>>> b
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> c
array([[0],
       [1],
       [2],
       [3],
       [4],
       [5]])
>>> b==c
array([[ True, False, False, False, False],
       [False,  True, False, False, False],
       [False, False,  True, False, False],
       [False, False, False,  True, False],
       [False, False, False, False,  True],
       [False, False, False, False, False]], dtype=bool)
>>> np.any(b==c,axis=1)
array([ True,  True,  True,  True,  True, False], dtype=bool)

Well for large arrays you can try:

import timeit

s="""
import numpy as np
array_size=500
a=np.random.randint(500, size=(array_size))
b=np.random.randint(500, size=(array_size))
c=np.random.randint(500, size=(array_size))
"""

ex1="""
a[np.any(b==c.reshape(-1,1),axis=0)]
"""

ex2="""
a[np.in1d(b,c)]
"""

print 'Example 1 took',timeit.timeit(ex1,setup=s,number=100),'seconds.'
print 'Example 2 took',timeit.timeit(ex2,setup=s,number=100),'seconds.'

When array_size is 50:

Example 1 took 0.00323104858398 seconds.
Example 2 took 0.0125901699066 seconds.

When array_size is 500:

Example 1 took 0.142632007599 seconds.
Example 2 took 0.0283041000366 seconds.

When array_size is 5,000:

Example 1 took 16.2110910416 seconds.
Example 2 took 0.170011043549 seconds.

When array_size is 50,000 (number=5):

Example 1 took 33.0327301025 seconds.
Example 2 took 0.0996031761169 seconds.

Note I had to change which axis for np.any() so the results would be the same. Reverse order of np.in1d or switch axis of np.any for desired effect. You can take reshape out of example 1, but reshape is really quite fast. Switch to obtain the desired effect. Really interesting- I will have to use this in the future.

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thanks this is what I'm looking for but it's still rather slow for very large arrays –  Matteo Mar 29 '13 at 18:00
    
@Matteo: For a 1 million size array of ints, b==c is 1 trillion bytes, so it will probably be a bit slow. (Not to put down this answer, though, kudos and +1 to Ophion for correctly guessing what you're looking for!) –  tom10 Mar 29 '13 at 18:06
    
Added a faster method. @tom10 I was 90% sure what he wanted was your solution after you posted it :). –  Ophion Mar 29 '13 at 19:59
    
@Ophion: Great, in1d seems to be exactly the right thing. It's odd that 50,000 takes half the time of 5,000 though? –  tom10 Mar 29 '13 at 21:41
    
@tom10 For the 50,000 I had reduced the number of trials by a factor of 20. –  Ophion Mar 29 '13 at 22:30
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How about np.where() :

>>> a  = np.array([2,4,8,16])
>>> b  = np.array([0,0,0,0])
>>> c  = np.array([1,0,0,1])
>>> bc = np.where(b==c)[0] #indices where b == c
>>> a[bc]
array([4,8])

This should do the trick. Not sure if the timing is optimal for your purposes

>>> a = np.random.randint(0,10000,1000000)
>>> b = np.random.randint(0,10000,1000000)
>>> c = np.random.randint(0,10000,1000000)
>>> %timeit( a[ np.where( b == c )[0] ]   )
100 loops, best of 3: 11.3 ms per loop
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