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I'm in the process of relearning programming after several years and I'm currently focusing on both C# and Lua. The book I'm using for Lua has an example for a Linked List, but I'm having a difficult time understanding exactly how it's working.

list = nil
for line in io.lines() do
   list = {next = list, value = line}
end

If i'm reading this right

  • it's creating a new table
  • assigning list to that table, setting the "next" key/identifier (correct terminology?) to point to the list (which is still nil at the point of the first created table)
  • then setting the "value" key/identifier to be whatever was read in
  • then the "list" is now actually pointing to the newly created table

Then on the next run through of the loop

  • creating the next table
  • setting the "next" key/identifier to point to the list (which is now pointing to the previously created table)
  • then setting the "value" key/identifier to be whatever was read in
  • then the "list" is now actually pointing to the newly created table...again

I just wanted to be sure I understood exactly how this was working as it seemed a little odd/weird that the list was trying was creating a table and pointing to whatever it was currently pointing to just before the execution of the line completed and the list was updated to point at the newest created table.

Or am I way off here?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is somewhat similar to what LIFO linked lists are in other languages(like or ). Yes, you were following it correctly.

Suppose my inputs are:(in the same order)

  • 21
  • Hi
  • 35
  • No

Then, my list is created as:

list = {
    value = "No",
    next = {
        value = 35,
        next = {
            value = "Hi",
            next = {
                value = 21
                next = nil
            }
        }
    }
}
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Thanks so much. I was really confused by the assignments that were happening with "next" specifically, since it sort of looked like it was just being set to itself, but apparently understanding the order in which the assignments occur as the code is executed is key to understanding how this was working. I had anticipated some sort of "middle man" node like "current", similar to what I did back when I was learning C++ data structures. Thanks for helping me knock off a little rust! –  WannabeCoder Mar 29 '13 at 19:42

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