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Let's say I have a generic List<ICalculation> which serves as a repository for all predefined calculations in my application...

I have a generic interface called ICalculation<T, U> which implements the more basic ICalculation.

public interface ICalculation
{
    string Identifier { get; }
    object Calculate(object inputData);
}

public interface ICalculation<in TIn, out TOut> : ICalculation
{
    string Identifier { get; }
    TOut Calculate(TIn inputData)
}

I also have an abstract class CalculationBase that implements this interface

public abstract class CalculationBase<TIn, TOut> : ICalculation<in TIn, out TOut>, ICalculation
{
    public abstract string Identifier { get; }
    public abstract Func<TIn, TOut> Calculation { get; }
    public virtual TOut Calculate(TIn inputData)
    {
        return Calculate(inputData, Calculation);
    }
    virtual object ICalculation.Calculate(object inputData)
    {
        return (TOut)calculation((TIn)inputData);
    }
    public static TOut Calculate(TIn inputData, Func<TIn, TOut> calculation)
    {
        if (calculation == null || inputData == null)
            return default(TOut);

        return calculation(inputData);
    }
}

So, now I have a whole bunch of calculations that implement CalculationBase that function over some input... one example:

public sealed class NumberOfBillableInvoices : CalculationBase<IClientAccount, int>
{
    public override string identifier { get { return "@BillableInvoiceCount"; } }
    public override Func<IClientAccount, int> Calculation
    {
        get { return inputData => inputData.Invoices.Count(i => i.IsBillable); }
    }
} 

Each calculation is targeted at a specific type of object and returns different outputs depending on the nature of the calculation. For instance: Currency calculations may return decimals, counters would probably return integers or longs etc.

I have a calculation repository that loads itself up on application load and when there comes a time that a formula must be evaluated, the calculation engine takes the object that is being queried against - in this example, if we have some concrete instance of type IClientAccount and we wish to evaluate some formula against it - for instance, levy $1.20 for each invoice after the first 5: "Math.Max(@BillableInvoiceCount - 5, 0) * $1.20". The engine goes and grabs all calculations where TIn is of type IClientAccount and matches the calculation with the token found in the formula (i.e. @BillableInvoiceCount). Then some calculation engine such as NCalc, FLEE or another calculation engine would evaluate the final equation.

So, my problem is that I don't wish to iterate through every calculation looking for the correct token - and realistically, tokens could collide if they spanned multiple object types. For instance I may want to use the same token to mean different things in different contexts. It would be easier if I could narrow the calculations in my repository to just those where TIn matches the object type I'm trying to calculate against.

I have a few trains of thought at this point -

1). Can I create a repository that marshals only the TIn part of my object? I think the answer to this is likely, no... but on the chance of it being possible, I don't have the first clue how to implement this - does anyone have any ideas?

2). Is there a way to query my repository for all calculations where TIn matches the type of the object I'm querying against? If so, how?

3). Do I have multiple repositories based on all the combinations of TIn/TOut that I have calculations for... and if so, how do I go about marrying up the correct repositories with the object I'm querying against? Because I'm still trying to match up a repository based on only the TIn portion...

4). Make all my calculations return doubles instead of allowing them to return different types, then my repositories can be typed to just the input type making them simpler... but while this is simple, semantically, it just feels wrong.

Thoughts?

Cheers in advance :)

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Consider using decimals instead of doubles for currency calculations. Use doubles for physical quantities like length or mass. –  Eric Lippert Mar 30 '13 at 4:15
    
Thanks Eric... perhaps my reference to currencies should have been for decimals... now I think about it, my classes in my codebase actually use decimals for currency - I corrected my reference, thanks ;) –  BenAlabaster Mar 30 '13 at 4:16

3 Answers 3

Remember that generics are a compile time artifact, you need to know at the time of writing what class you want if you want to use them. If you need run-time checking then the non-generic way is probably best.

Assuming you know you have the correct types your object -> object overload should work fine for your purposes. The .NET framework will throw an exception if the mapping fails so you don't have to worry about a silent failure there.

1). Can I create a repository that marshals only the TIn part of my object? I think the answer to this is likely, no... but on the chance of it being possible, I don't have the first clue how to implement this - does anyone have any ideas?

Marshalling refers to conversion of the underlying data, you can likely simply pass around raw objects in this case since your ICalculation.Calculate method does a conversion for you. The only problem you might have is if TIn is a value type and you pass in a null (in which case your Calculate null handling would not occur)

2). Is there a way to query my repository for all calculations where TIn matches the type of the object I'm querying against? If so, how?

I would try using the non-generic version, unless you want cleaner exception trees it should do the job in this case.

3). Do I have multiple repositories based on all the combinations of TIn/TOut that I have calculations for... and if so, how do I go about marrying up the correct repositories with the object I'm querying against? Because I'm still trying to match up a repository based on only the TIn portion...

If you wanted to do this the trick would be to have your saving method only save TIn rather than both. For example a Dictionary<Type,ICalculation> where the Type is TIn.

4). Make all my calculations return doubles instead of allowing them to return different types, then my repositories can be typed to just the input type making them simpler... but while this is simple, semantically, it just feels wrong.

One thing to be careful of here, my suggestions only work if you aren't doing any conversions between method calls. If you have an int in an object and you try to convert it to a double it will fail.

You could avoid this by calling Convert.ChangeType instead of doing a direct cast. It would work like so:

object ICalculation.Calculate(object inputData)
{
    if (inputData == null && typeof(TIn).IsValueType)
        return default(TOut);
    return Calculate((TIn)Convert.ChangeType(inputData, typeof(TIn));
}

Note a couple of changes to the method:

  • I added an explicit null handler for value types, since Convert.ChangeType would just throw an exception.
  • I call the generic form of Calculate in case it was overloaded.
  • I made it non-virtual, unless you really have a good reason, you really shouldn't be overloading this method, since it just provides the symmetry of the two interfaces.
  • I don't convert the result. Both calculation and Calculate are guaranteed to return TOut so a conversion is redundant.
  • The addition of ChangeType which would allow you to silently handle passing an int into a decimal.

Note that there is a danger with ChangeType, it will be similar to an explicit cast. It will do its best to do the conversion no matter what happens to your data. It seems like overflows will be handled as expected, but truncations will happen silently.

The main point there is test your edge cases if you have any like that.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thanks for the detailed response. +1 just for the effort. I will need to add some specificity to the interface to prevent TIn being a value type... and also need some runtime checking to prevent TIn being null... I definitely like the approach of using Convert.ChangeTo for the silent conversion of datatypes so that is definitely up for consideration. –  BenAlabaster Mar 30 '13 at 4:13
    
where TIn : class should restrict it to non-value types. –  Guvante Mar 30 '13 at 5:39

If you know everything derives from CalculationBase<,>, I suppose you could do:

// can also be made an extension method
static bool HasCorrectInType(ICalculation calc, Type desiredInType)
{
  var t = calc.GetType();
  do
  {
    if (t.IsGenericType && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(CalculationBase<,>))
      return t.GetGenericArguments()[0].IsAssignableFrom(desiredInType);
    t = t.BaseType;
  } while (t != null)

  throw new Exception("The type " + calc.GetType() + " not supported");
}

Then use it like this:

List<ICalculation> repository = XXX;
var matches = repository.Where(c => HasCorrectInType(c, type));

Edit: New idea: If you put a new property:

public Type InType
{
  get { return typeof(TIn); }
}

into your abstract class CalculationBase<TIn, TOut>, and also add this property to your non-generic interface ICalculation, then you won't have to iterate through the base classes, but can say calc.InType.IsAssignableFrom(desiredInType) directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Not ideal, but I like it... I may use this, depending how it performs. Thanks :) –  BenAlabaster Mar 29 '13 at 18:35
    
@BenAlabaster I got a new idea that is more ideal, perhaps (see edit). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 29 '13 at 19:33
    
In response to your edit, I'd actually been considering this approach independently. It suits the purpose of trying to evaluate it at runtime, but I'm not sure if it sullies my base class... though it is worth consideration. I think if I have my calculation engine which will end up doing all the marshaling of the formulas and objects handle the evaluation of which calculations to use, that will be suitable. –  BenAlabaster Mar 30 '13 at 3:53

I think the simplest solution should be picked. You can use reflection to get the specific type or just return double in all cases. If it is an intensive data processing, trying to find the specific type might slow it down, so returning a double or integer is totally fine.

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