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I'm playing around with Caliburn.Micro and have a very simple application now.

It has an AppView, which actually has a ContentControl for a NavigationBar, an InnerView and a StatusBar.

Now I want to handle Navigation between different inner views.

Right now I use the eventaggregator to publish a NavigationEvent, which should switch the innerview of the mainwindow to another view.

Here is my call to Publish (all InnerViews have the same baseclass which has an IEventAggregator)

public void NavigateOverview()
{
    base._eventAggregator.Publish(new NavigateEvent("OverviewViewModel"));
}

Right now I pass a string to the AppViewModel, which handles the NavigateEvent:

        public void Handle(NavigateEvent navigate)
        {
            InnerViewModel target;

            switch (navigate.TargetViewModel)
            {
                case "SelectProjectViewModel":
                {
                    target = new SelectProjectViewModel(_eventAggregator);
                    break;
                }
                case "OverviewViewModel":
                {
                    target = new OverviewViewModel(_eventAggregator);
                    break;
                }
                default:
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("no target type found");
                }
            }

            this.CurrentInnerViewModel = target;
        }

Passing strings works, but is errorprone and not very clean.

What is the Caliburn way of handling that? Is that what a Conductor should do?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not just pass a type instead? That way there are no magic strings

e.g.

public void NavigateOverview()
{
    base._eventAggregator.Publish(new NavigateEvent(typeof(OverviewViewModel)));
}

then:

    public void Handle(NavigateEvent navigate)
    {
        InnerViewModel target;

        // EDIT: Remove the case (only works with integral types so you can't use typeof etc)
        // but you could do this with standard conditional logic

        this.CurrentInnerViewModel = target;
    }

Edit 2:

Ok since you asked about building into CMs IoC, here is an example for using the IoC with Castle Windsor and a solution for passing additional parameters to navigation (borrowing from EventAggregator)

The bootstrapper just needs a few bits and pieces to config the container:

public class AppBootstrapper : Bootstrapper<ShellViewModel>
{
    // The Castle Windsor container
    private IWindsorContainer _container;

    protected override void Configure()
    {
        base.Configure();

        // Create the container, install from the current assembly (installer code shown in next section below)
        _container = new WindsorContainer();
        _container.Install(FromAssembly.This());
    }

    // Matches up with Windsors ResolveAll nicely
    protected override IEnumerable<object> GetAllInstances(Type service)
    {
        return (IEnumerable<object>)_container.ResolveAll(service);
    }

    // Matches up with Windsors Resolve
    protected override object GetInstance(Type service, string key)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(key) ? _container.Resolve(service) : _container.Resolve(key, service);
    }

    // Windsor doesn't do property injection by default, but it's easy enough to get working:
    protected override void BuildUp(object instance)
    {
        // Get all writable public properties on the instance we will inject into
        instance.GetType().GetProperties().Where(property => property.CanWrite && property.PropertyType.IsPublic)
        // Make sure we have a matching service type to inject by looking at what's registered in the container
                                          .Where(property => _container.Kernel.HasComponent(property.PropertyType))
        // ...and for each one inject the instance
                                          .ForEach(property => property.SetValue(instance, _container.Resolve(property.PropertyType), null));
    }
}

The Windsor Installer for CM will probably be as simple as:

public class CaliburnMicroInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        // Register the window manager
        container.Register(Component.For<IWindowManager>().ImplementedBy<WindowManager>());

        // Register the event aggregator
        container.Register(Component.For<IEventAggregator>().ImplementedBy<EventAggregator>());
    }
}

I also have a navigation service interface to aid with application navigation:

public interface INavigationService
{
    void Navigate(Type viewModelType, object modelParams);
}

Which is implemented by NavigationService (show you that in a sec)

That needs a Windsor installer too:

public class NavigationInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        container.Register(Component.For<INavigationService>().ImplementedBy<NavigationService>());
    }
}

The NavigationService works much like EventAggregator in that the type that exposes navigation arguments should implement a generic interface for each argument class that it can receive...

The interface looks like this (borrowing heavily from EventAggregator):

// This is just to help with some reflection stuff
public interface IViewModelParams { }

public interface IViewModelParams<T> : IViewModelParams        
{
    // It contains a single method which will pass arguments to the viewmodel after the nav service has instantiated it from the container
    void ProcessParameters(T modelParams);
}

example:

public class ExampleViewModel : Screen, 
    // We can navigate to this using DefaultNavigationArgs...
    IViewModelParams<DefaultNavigationArgs>, 
    // or SomeNavigationArgs, both of which are nested classes...
    IViewModelParams<SomeOtherNavigationArgs>
{
    public class DefaultNavigationArgs
    {
        public string Value { get; private set; }

        public DefaultNavigationArgs(string value)
        {
            Value = value;
        }
    }

    public class OtherNavigationArgs
    {
        public int Value { get; private set; }

        public DefaultNavigationArgs(int value)
        {
            Value = value;
        }
    }

    public void ProcessParameters(DefaultNavigationArgs modelParams)
    {            
        // Do something with args
        DisplayName = modelParams.Value;
    }

    public void ProcessParameters(OtherNavigationArgs modelParams)
    {            
        // Do something with args. this time they are int!
        DisplayName = modelParams.Value.ToString();
    }
}

This leads to some strongly typed navigation (e.g. refactor friendly!)

NavigationService.Navigate(typeof(ExampleViewModel), new ExampleViewModel.DefaultNavigationArgs("hello"));

or

NavigationService.Navigate(typeof(ExampleViewModel), new ExampleViewModel.OtherNavigationArgs(15));

It also means that the ViewModel is still in control of it's own navigation parameters

Ok back to Windsor for a sec; obviously we need to install any views from our views namespace - Windsors fluent API makes this pretty easy:

public class ViewInstaller : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        // The 'true' here on the InSameNamespaceAs causes windsor to look in all sub namespaces too
        container.Register(Classes.FromThisAssembly().InSameNamespaceAs<ShellViewModel>(true));
    }
}

Ok now the NavigationService implementation:

public class NavigationService : INavigationService
{
    // Depends on the aggregator - this is how the shell or any interested VMs will receive
    // notifications that the user wants to navigate to someplace else
    private IEventAggregator _aggregator;

    public NavigationService(IEventAggregator aggregator)
    {
        _aggregator = aggregator;
    }

    // And the navigate method goes:
    public void Navigate(Type viewModelType, object modelParams)
    {
        // Resolve the viewmodel type from the container
        var viewModel = IoC.GetInstance(viewModelType, null);

        // Inject any props by passing through IoC buildup
        IoC.BuildUp(viewModel);

        // Check if the viewmodel implements IViewModelParams and call accordingly
        var interfaces = viewModel.GetType().GetInterfaces()
               .Where(x => typeof(IViewModelParams).IsAssignableFrom(x) && x.IsGenericType);

        // Loop through interfaces and find one that matches the generic signature based on modelParams...
        foreach (var @interface in interfaces)
        {
            var type = @interface.GetGenericArguments()[0];
            var method = @interface.GetMethod("ProcessParameters");

            if (type.IsAssignableFrom(modelParams.GetType()))
            {
                // If we found one, invoke the method to run ProcessParameters(modelParams)
                method.Invoke(viewModel, new object[] { modelParams });
            }
        }

        // Publish an aggregator event to let the shell/other VMs know to change their active view
        _aggregator.Publish(new NavigationEventMessage(viewModel));
    }
}

Now the shell can just handle the aggregator message and activate the new injected and additionally configured VM

public class ShellViewModel : Conductor<IScreen>, IHandle<NavigationEventMessage>
{
    private IEventAggregator _aggregator;
    private INavigationService _navigationService;

    public ShellViewModel(IEventAggregator aggregator, INavigationService _navigationService)
    {
        _aggregator = aggregator;
        _aggregator.Subscribe(this);

        _navigationService.Navigate(typeof (OneSubViewModel), null);
    }

    public void Handle(NavigationEventMessage message)
    {
        ActivateItem(message.ViewModel);
    }
}

Actually I constrain the navigation to just IScreen implementations so my NavigationEventMessage actually looks like this:

public class NavigationEventMessage
{
    public IScreen ViewModel { get; private set; }

    public NavigationEventMessage(IScreen viewModel)
    {
        ViewModel = viewModel;
    }
}

This is because I always want lifecycle for my child viewmodels

share|improve this answer
    
Have tried it. At the moment I use additionally var screen = Activator.CreateInstance(type, new[] { _eventAggregator }) as Screen; instead of the switch –  Mare Infinitus Mar 30 '13 at 20:12
    
Are you using a DI container? –  Charleh Mar 30 '13 at 20:17
    
I use Unity a lot, but not in this same Caliburn sample right now. You think I should resolve the ViewModels? –  Mare Infinitus Mar 31 '13 at 9:33
    
I do almost exactly the same thing but I'm just trying to work out if it makes sense to do it this way. If you were to pull from the container you would need a ref to the container - for factories and other stuff this might be an issue, but for the 'main' viewmodel it might be fine... just push stuff through the container to instantiate it. Would that be a problem for your params though (e.g. if the constructor took more than just IEventAggregator as it's dependencies, would you just expect to use caliburns IoC buildup to fill in the gaps or would you still want to do it via constructor?) –  Charleh Mar 31 '13 at 23:35
1  
Ok I've added a boatload of code for configuration and bootstrapper setup with Castle Windsor. This will work for any container, but Windsor is what I'm using at the moment. I've also added some ideas which work for me for navigating around the application. –  Charleh Apr 1 '13 at 22:23

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