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I'm trying to run a spatial autocorrelation (SAC) on light values across a sampling area. I did some searching, and I've found that Moran's I (in the ape package) is a common tool used in R to do SAC. However, I ran the code and I'm not entirely sure if R is doing what I want. The code doesn't break, but I've input my variable (transformed light values) using the Moran.I function:

Moran.I (ovenbird$ARCSINE.SQRT.TRAN, ld.dist.mat)

My distance matrix (ld.dist.mat) is a matrix of distances between all points (A-O) on my grid. It looks like this:

      A     B     C     D     E     F     G     H     I     J    K     L     M     N     O
A  0.00  5.00 10.00  2.50  5.59 10.31  5.00  7.07 11.18  7.50 9.01 12.50 10.00 11.18 14.14
B  5.00  0.00  5.00  5.59  2.50  5.59 11.18  5.00 11.18  9.01 7.50  9.01 11.18 10.00 11.18
C 10.00  5.00  0.00 10.31  5.59  2.50 11.18  7.07  5.00 12.50 9.01  7.50 14.14 11.18 10.00
D  2.50  5.59 10.31  0.00  5.00 10.00  2.50  5.59 10.31  5.00 7.07 11.18  7.50  9.01 12.50
E  5.59  2.50  5.59  5.00  0.00  5.00  5.59  2.50  5.59 11.18 5.00 11.18  9.01  7.50  9.01
F 10.31  5.59  2.50 10.00  5.00  0.00 10.31  5.59  2.50 11.18 7.07  5.00 12.50 11.18  7.50
G  5.00 11.18 11.18  2.50  5.59 10.31  0.00  5.00 10.00  2.50 5.59 10.31  5.00  7.07 11.18
H  7.07  5.00  7.07  5.59  2.50  5.59  5.00  0.00  5.00  5.59 2.50  5.59 11.18  5.00 11.18
I 11.18 11.18  5.00 10.31  5.59  2.50 10.00  5.00  0.00 10.31 5.59  2.50 11.18  7.07  5.00
J  7.50  9.01 12.50  5.00 11.18 11.18  2.50  5.59 10.31  0.00 5.00 10.00  2.50  5.59 10.31
K  9.01  7.50  9.01  7.07  5.00  7.07  5.59  2.50  5.59  5.00 0.00  5.00  5.59  2.50  5.59
L 12.50  9.01  7.50 11.18 11.18  5.00 10.31  5.59  2.50 10.00 5.00  0.00 10.31  5.59  2.50
M 10.00 11.18 14.14  7.50  9.01 12.50  5.00 11.18 11.18  2.50 5.59 10.31  0.00  5.00 10.00
N 11.18 10.00 11.18  9.01  7.50 11.18  7.07  5.00  7.07  5.59 2.50  5.59  5.00  0.00  5.00
O 14.14 11.18 10.00 12.50  9.01  7.50 11.18 11.18  5.00 10.31 5.59  2.50 10.00  5.00  0.00

My question is how does R know which points on my grid are associated with each light value? I have tried print(Moran.I) to figure this out, but I have only been programming since fall of last year (2012) and I am not well versed enough in R to know how to interpret the function. Also, if R isn't identifying my light values in the right way, how do I fix that?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Did my answer below help? If so, please mark it as the selected answer... –  Lucas Fortini Apr 9 '13 at 22:04
    
It would help a lot if you could provide a reproducible example that includes the data. This can be accomplished with an extra few lines that define "dummy" data that have the same shape/form as your real data. Furthermore, the spdep package probably has what you're looking for. –  Paul McMurdie Apr 15 '13 at 2:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do the following to get the global and local measures of spatial autocorrelation using Moran's measure using the code below:

library(raster)
r  <-  raster(nrows=10,  ncols=10)
r[]  <-  1:ncell(r)
Moran(r) #this is the global index of autocorrelation
x1  <-  MoranLocal(r) #local measure of autocorr as a raster object that can be plotted
plot(x1) #this will plot the autocorrelation raster results

For Geary's autocorr measure:

Geary(r) #this is the global index of autocorrelation
x1  <-  GearyLocal(r) #local measure
plot(x1)
share|improve this answer
    
How would this be done with just a general matrix of values? The matrix I listed above is a set of distances sampled at a collection site, not raster values. Could you also provide some insight into how the raster package is performing Moran's? It appears each package that implements it is for a different application and I haven't found one that fits my purpose well. I'm looking at incoming solar radiation across my site, and my matrix reflects distance values between my points. Each point has an associated light value I've measured, and I want to see if light changes across space. –  user2225641 Mar 30 '13 at 18:04
    
Sorry for taking a while to reply- did you check the pdf documentation for the Ape package? In it is specifies the formula used for calculating the Moran index (p. 131). From what I gathered, it calculates the autocorrelation by looking at differences in values between one observation and all other observations weighted by the distance among observations, so it seems to be doing what you want it to do. Sorry about my answer above, I incorrectly implied that you had an underlying raster with all values for your variable of interest. –  Lucas Fortini Apr 3 '13 at 20:09
    
I did check that out, but thought it was used more for phylogenetic diversity measurements, based on Gittleman and Kot (1990). I wasn't sure if it was appropriate. I did input my matrix, and it gave me output without breaking. I just wasn't sure if it was using those distances correctly since they aren't actually tree distances. –  user2225641 Apr 4 '13 at 21:07
    
While the application is for phylogenetics, the principle seems to apply- for you to estimate autocorrelation among your known points, you need also only a distance metric and the values. The problem may be if spatial variability between your sampled points is too large (or in opposite terms- do you believe that the points you have accurately describe the landscape fro which they were extracted from?). –  Lucas Fortini Apr 5 '13 at 17:08
    
If you still do not trust this answer, create two data sets of 100 points with the same set of increasing values. For one, place them in a linear transect coordinates (0,0; 0,1; 0,2; ... 0,100) and on the other place them in random coordinates along the same transect (0,87; 0,35; etc.). Apply this approach you used in both to see if you get what you expect (a very strong spatial correlation index for the first and a very weak SC for the second. Lastly, one of the authors for the package is Ben Bolker, one of the most active users in the r tag in stackoverflow- you may send him a quick message. –  Lucas Fortini Apr 5 '13 at 17:08

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