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I have this piece of code, which enables two divs to slide in from the left on scroll, the problem is that the 2 DIVs overlap themselves while sliding in, and another problem is that this code launches a function, rather than moving closer together as you're scrolling. I would rather it move to the center accordingly to the scroll position.

I would love if someone could help me modify this code to do what I mentioned above.

Here it is on jsfiddle http://jsfiddle.net/qqSc3/1/

jQuery(document).ready(function(){
var slide = jQuery(".post-129");
var slide2 = jQuery(".post-169");
var opening = false;
var closing = false;
jQuery(window).scroll(function() {
var pos = jQuery(window).scrollTop();
console.log(pos);
if (pos > 100) {
    if (!opening) {
        opening = true; closing = false;
        slide.stop().animate({
            'opacity': 1,
            'margin-left': 0
        }, 1000, function() {
            opening = false;
        });
        slide2.stop().animate({
            'opacity': 1,
            'margin-left': 0
        }, 1000, function() {
            opening = false;
        });
    }


} else {
    if (!closing) {
        closing = true; opening = false;
        slide.stop().animate({
            'opacity': 0,
            'margin-left': -1000
        }, 500, function() {
            closing = false;
        });
         slide2.stop().animate({
            'opacity': 0,
            'margin-left': -1000
        }, 500, function() {
            closing = false;
        });
    }
}
});
});

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand what you mean. In Firefox at least, the divs don't overlap in any way. And what does "moving closer together as you're scrolling" mean, and what does "move to the center accordingly to the scroll position" mean? It's just not clear. Wait... Are you saying you want the divs to slide in gradually based on the exact height of the scrollbar, rather than just scroll all the way in or out based on a threshold? –  ErikE Mar 29 '13 at 21:17
    
Yes, that's exactly what I mean. sorry for being vague, had a hard time trying to explain. The overlapping doesn't happen in the jsfiddle, but it does on my website, I should be able to fix that on my own using css. –  Maxim Siebert Mar 29 '13 at 21:46
    
Sigh. I had a great idea, coded it in jsfiddle, then stupidly hit refresh and lost it all. Good day. –  ErikE Mar 29 '13 at 21:46
    
that really sucks! Thanks for your time. –  Maxim Siebert Mar 29 '13 at 21:47
    
Could you possible explain the gist of how you were doing it ? –  Maxim Siebert Mar 29 '13 at 21:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this.

See it in a JS Fiddle

function scrollingSlider(selector, beginpos, endpos) {
    var slide,
        timeout = 0;
    slide = function () {
        var scrollpos;
        window.clearTimeout(timeout);
        timeout = 0;
        scrollpos = $(window).scrollTop();
        $(selector).each(function () {
            var $this = $(this),
                margintarget,
                margin = parseInt($this.css('margin-left'), 10),
                step;
            if (scrollpos <= beginpos) {
                margintarget = -1000;
            } else if (scrollpos >= endpos) {
                margintarget = 0;
            } else {
                margintarget = Math.round(-1000 * (endpos - scrollpos) / (endpos - beginpos));
            }
            if (margintarget === margin) {
                return; // nothing more to do
            }
            step = margintarget - margin;
            if (Math.abs(step) > 25) {
                step = 25 * (step < 0 ? -1 : 1);
            }
            $this.css('margin-left', margin + step);
            if (!timeout && (margin + step) !== margintarget) {
                timeout = window.setTimeout(slide, 10);
            }
        });
    };
    $(window).on('scroll', slide);
}
$(document).ready(function (){
    scrollingSlider('.post-129, .post-169', 100, 300);
});

Notes

To use the scrollingSlider function, pass in a jQuery selector, the scrolltop position in pixels at which to begin sliding in, and the scrolltop position in pixels at which the slide should be complete. If you use a string selector, you will avoid the potential problem of creating a closure over DOM elements that could interfere with releasing memory in heavy usage scenarios.

Positioning

Also, I recommend that instead of using the scroll position to determine when to show the elements, that instead you change the code to slide things in based on where each element's current top is compared to how far it is from being in view at the bottom of the scroll window. This accomplishes two things:

  1. If you change your page to add or remove content (thus changing the vertical positioning of your elements) you don't have the scrolling working wrong.
  2. More importantly, for anyone with a large screen big enough to contain the entire page, they will never even see your slide-in elements because they have no scroll bar! Tying the visibility of things to the position of the scrollbar (rather than the distance the item has to enter the viewport) is a good way to make your content completely unreachable--probably not what you're looking for. Note: my current screen is 2880 pixels high, and if I rotated it to be in portrait mode, it would be 5120 pixels high. That's a lot of web page visible at once. Accommodating these large screen sizes will take some careful thought. You could play around with adding some kind of padding or spacing at the bottom of the page that is dependent on the window height, forcing the scroll bars to appear and be usable (meaning scrolling to the bottom causes the lowest visible item to be at or beyond the top of the page instead of the bottom).

One more note: I dispensed with the opacity entirely. The problem was because in CSS you must say -1000px as -1000 has no unit and is ignored. The only time you may use no unit is with 0--otherwise, how will the browser know you mean pixels rather than, say ems?.

True enough, I didn't use jQuery's animation ability. I probably could have. Instead of setting my own timeout to run the function again, I could have simply told jQuery to animate the element to the correct position, with a .stop() first to stop any outstanding animation. That would have been perfectly valid. I just did it this way this time. Feel free to modify.

Explanation

Set up the initial trigger for sliding to be the scroll event. In the slide function, for each element that we are interested in, calculate the target left margin we want to slide to based on the current scroll position. Move the element no more than 25 pixels toward that target. If the target position has not been reached, set a timer to repeat this process. Since a scroll event not only can change the target position radically but can set off its own cascade of animation, cancel any outstanding timer that is set at the beginning of the slide function.

Speed Considerations

If you find that 10ms is too often and animation is chunky or too CPU-intensive, raise it so the function fires less often, increasing the maximum step by a similar factor (currently 25). If the animation is too slow or too fast, increase or lower the maximum step accordingly.

Further speed improvement ideas:

In your web site, there is other code running at the same time that's preventing the slide function from being called before 10ms is up. Weird things then happen.

  1. Use ids instead of classes on your sliding elements.

  2. As suggested, change the timeout to something like 40ms or 100ms and increase the maximum number of pixels the object is moved similarly.

  3. In your targeted usage scenario your two images are locked together, so take out the each function and just do the operation on both at the same time--this should achieve some significant reduction in execution time.

Last, a usage note: Don't include the script multiple times to animate multiple objects. Instead, just call scrollingSlider multiple times in the ready function!

UPDATE

Please see the "Positioning" section above, which has been updated with new and important information about screen sizes.

share|improve this answer
    
This works perfect, but for some reason once applied to my website, the posts slide at a very very slow speed. how can I fix that –  Maxim Siebert Mar 29 '13 at 22:57
    
One more update with a usage note. –  ErikE Mar 29 '13 at 23:19

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