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I have a variable containing [some digits] example:

set parse_var "Interface {} {} [1] [] 
FastEther0/1} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} 
unassigned {} {} {} {} {} YES unset {} administratively down down"

when I do puts $parse_var the script breaks because of [1].

invalid command name "1" while executing "1"

How do I handle this token, I need to split parse_var after puts statement

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set parse_var "Interface {} {} [1] –  user2225716 Mar 29 '13 at 21:33
    
Is there really an unbalanced brace after FastEther0/1? Yuck… –  Donal Fellows Mar 30 '13 at 14:20

2 Answers 2

That error doesn't occur on the puts, it occurs on the set. Double-quoted strings perform interpolation, so it's trying to run [1] immediately.

If the braces were balanced in your string, you could just replace the quotes with braces, but unfortunately you have an unbalanced close-brace after FastEther0/1. So instead, you may want to simply escape the [s with a \, like so:

set parse_var "Interface {} {} \[1] \[]
FastEther0/1} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
unassigned {} {} {} {} {} YES unset {} administratively down down"
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for set parse_var "[1]" . Even though now the braces are balanced I get the same error invalid command name "1" while executing "1" –  user2225716 Mar 29 '13 at 21:35
    
I got it what you guys are saying. Thanks a lot –  user2225716 Mar 29 '13 at 21:40
    
@user2225716: { is a brace. [ is a bracket. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 29 '13 at 21:48
1  
+1 for pointing out that you can't brace quote an unbalanced brace, unless it happens to have a preceding backslash or if you can put a backslash before it and the result will still be the same, like eval {puts "\}"}. –  potrzebie Mar 29 '13 at 22:07

The square brackets have special meaning in Tcl: it invoke a command, in this case the command name is 1, and return substitute the [...] with output of that command. It is called command substitution. To avoid that you can:

  1. Use braces { ... } instead of quotes " ... "
  2. Or, escaping, see Kevin Ballard's solution

If you want to use the braces:

set parse_var {Interface {} {} [1] [] 
FastEther0/1} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} 
unassigned {} {} {} {} {} YES unset {} administratively down down}
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Did you try this? The braces in the string are mismatched. Notably. FastEther0/1} has no opening brace. This is why I suggested the escaping solution. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 29 '13 at 21:49
    
That's because user2225716 has a mis-matched brace that follows FastEther0/1. Garbage in, garbage out. –  Hai Vu Mar 29 '13 at 21:57
    
Who says that's garbage? Maybe it's supposed to look like that. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 29 '13 at 22:25
    
You are right. I stand corrected. –  Hai Vu Mar 29 '13 at 22:42

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