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Given the following MySQL table structure:

CREATE TABLE `order_params`( `order_id` BIGINT(30) NOT NULL, 
              `key` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL, `value` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL ); 

And this data:

INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('1', 'browser', 'Firefox'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('1', 'os', 'Windows'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('2', 'browser', 'Firefox'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('2', 'os', 'Windows'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('3', 'browser', 'Firefox'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('3', 'os', 'OSX'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('4', 'browser', 'Safari'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('4', 'os', 'OSX'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('5', 'browser', 'Safari'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('5', 'os', 'OSX'); 
INSERT INTO `order_params` (`order_id`, `key`, `value`) VALUES ('5', 'version', '5'); 

How do I get the following results?

browser Firefox os Windows              2
browser Firefox os OSX                  1
browser Safari os OSX                   1
browser Safari os OSX version 5         1

The numbers on the right are the count of records that match the unique key/value combinations. Is this even possible?

OK, updating to show that I have tried this:

SELECT CONCAT(`key`, `value`), COUNT(*)
FROM order_params 
GROUP BY `order_id`, `key`, `value`;

And this is the result:

browserFirefox  1
osWindows       1
browserFirefox  1
osWindows       1
browserFirefox  1
osOS X          1
browserSafari   1
osOS X          1

I've also tried this:

SELECT `key`, `value`, COUNT(*)
FROM order_params 
GROUP BY `key`, `value`;

Which produces this:

browser Firefox  3
browser Safari   1
os OS X          2
os Windows       2

Obviously, neither of these is the desired result.

share|improve this question
    
Please try and come with doubts. – fedorqui Mar 29 '13 at 21:25
    
This question does not show any research effort. It is important to do your homework. Tell us what you found and why it didn't meet your needs. This demonstrates that you've taken the time to try to help yourself, it saves us from reiterating obvious answers, and most of all it helps you get a more specific and relevant answer. FAQ. – Kermit Mar 29 '13 at 21:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

One approach is two stages of aggregation

select browser, os, version, count(*)
from (select order_id,
             max(case when `key` = 'browser' then `value` end) as browser,
             max(case when `key` = 'os' then `value` end) as os,
             max(case when `key` = 'version' then `value` end) as version
      from order_params op
      group by order_id
     ) p
group by browser, os, version

If you actually want the string that you have, you can concat things together:

select concat(coalesce(concat('browser ', browser), ''),
              coalesce(concat('os ', os), ''),
              coalesce(concat('version ', version), ''), count(*)
from (select order_id,
             max(case when `key` = 'browser' then `value` end) as browser,
             max(case when `key` = 'os' then `value` end) as os,
             max(case when `key` = 'version' then `value` end) as version
      from order_params op
      group by order_id
     ) p
group by os, browser, version
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this. So I can only do this if I know the keys ahead of time, and code it into my SQL statement? I was hoping to do it for N number of keys. – Nobody Mar 29 '13 at 21:43
    
What you're looking for is a "pivot" operator, which mysql doesn't have. If you search the site for "mysql pivot" you'll find many workarounds. – Barmar Mar 29 '13 at 21:52
1  
Thanks. This doesn't look as fun as I thought it would be. I'm going to flatten the data model for this table and just use fixed columns rather than deal with pivoting every time I want to run a query. – Nobody Mar 29 '13 at 22:51

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