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When I call User.create_user, I get the following error:

IntegrityError at /login
users_user.status_id may not be NULL

Note: I have looked at a bunch of other IntegrityError questions on SO, and I couldn't fix this problem.

My models look like this:

class Status(models.Model):
    status = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    status_time = models.DateTimeField('date published')

    def __init__(self, status = '', time=timezone.datetime.min, *args, **kwargs):
        self.status = status
        self.status_time = time
        super(Status, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def set_status(self, s):
        self.status = s
        self.status_time = timezone.datetime.now()
        self.save()

    def get_status(self):
        now = timezone.datetime.now()
        if now-self.status_time<datetime.timedelta(minutes=15):
            return self.status
        return None

class User(models.Model):
    facebook_id = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    friends = ListField()
    status = models.OneToOneField(Status)

    @classmethod
    def create_user(cls, fid, friends):
        k = User()
        k.facebook_id = fid
        k.friends = friends
        k.save() #THE PROBLEM IS HERE
        k.status = Status()
        k.status.set_status('')
        k.status.save()
        k.save()

I also still don't understand what User.status_id represents. Why is it there, and why can it not be None?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you save your user with an uncreated status. Create a status first, then you can save the user:

   def create_user(cls, fid, friends):
        k = User()

        k.status = Status()
        k.status.set_status('') # set_status saves the status

        k.facebook_id = fid
        k.friends = friends
        k.save()

Or better yet:

   def create_user(cls, fid, friends):
        status = Status()
        status.set_status('')
        User.objects.create(facebook_id=fid, friends=friends, status=status)

 

In idiomatic django code, methods like create_user should be on the models' manager:

class UserManager(models.Manager):
    def create_user(self, fid, friends):
        status = Status()
        status.set_status('')
        return self.create(facebook_id=fid, friends=friends, status=status)


class User(models.Model):
    facebook_id = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    friends = ListField()
    status = models.OneToOneField(Status)

    objects = UserManager()

Then you call it like this:

new_user = User.objects.create_user(fid, friends)

 

Then you notice you could've just used the builtin objects.create, if only there were a default status:

# A custom manager is no longer needed

class User(models.Model):
    facebook_id = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    friends = ListField()
    status = models.OneToOneField(Status)

    def save(self, *a, **kw):
        # if this user doesn't have a status yet, create an empty one
        if self.status is None:
            self.status = Status()
            self.status.set_status('')

        super(User, self).save(*a, **kw)

# creating users:

new_user = User.objects.create(facebook_id=fid, friends=friends)

# status is set to an empty one automatically in save
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! This worked like a charm. I actually have another question on this same project, and since you seem to be knowledgeable about this, I was wondering if you could help me there too? It's at stackoverflow.com/questions/15712582/… Thanks! –  Abs Mar 29 '13 at 22:48

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