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I am trying to convert a Java project into a C++ project. In the Java project, I used an ArrayList, but I don't know the best way of handling what I did in C++.

Currently I am using a std::vector because it allows access of elements at arbitrary positions, and because it has an insert method. Like a Java ArrayList, I want to be able to insert an element at a certain position (int p) in the vector and have the element currently at p (if any) shifted to p+1. And subsequent elements would be shifted as well.

std::vector.insert for a single entry looks like this:

iterator insert (iterator position, const value_type& val);

and the description from http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/vector/vector/insert/ says

Because vectors use an array as their underlying storage, inserting elements in positions other than the vector end causes the container to relocate all the elements that were after position to their new positions.

Does this mean that insert actually puts the new element at p+1 and NOT p? Does it not shift the element currently at p as well?

Also, why does the insert method take in an iterator instead of just a number index? I don't see the advantage. It just makes it more difficult to insert at arbitrary positions. Is there some way to construct an iterator to be at a specific location without having to iterate there? I only see comparisons at http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iterator/RandomAccessIterator/

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ArrayList works like a vector in that it "uses an array as the underlying storage" and "relocate" does indeed mean "move". From the same link: "The vector is extended by inserting new elements before the element at the specified position, effectively increasing the container size by the number of elements inserted." – user166390 Mar 29 '13 at 22:45
    
DOes it reallocate the element at the position where a new element is being inserted? Or does it keep it where it is and just put the new element right after it? – AAB Mar 29 '13 at 22:48
2  
"The vector is extended by inserting new elements before the element at the specified position, effectively increasing the container size by the number of elements inserted." – user166390 Mar 29 '13 at 22:48
    
@pst Thanks I missed that. – AAB Mar 29 '13 at 22:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The vector does exactly what you need, but the boundary condition is a bit different.

The iterator you give it points to the element you want to insert before.

In other wirds, if you pass it an iterator pointing to the first element, then it will insert the new element at the start of the vector, and push the element that was the first to the second position.

Also, why does the insert method take in an iterator instead of just a number index? I don't see the advantage. It just makes it more difficult to insert at arbitrary positions. Is there some way to construct an iterator to be at a specific location without having to iterate there?

Why is it more difficult?

To get an iterator pointing to the 17th element, do this:

vec.begin() + 17;

I don't know what you mean by "having to iterate there", but you don't need to increment the iterator 17 times.

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Thanks, It's been a long day of C++ when I'd rather just work with Java. Thanks for explaining it, the iterator is easier to use than I thought. Again, thanks so much. – AAB Mar 29 '13 at 22:54
1  
@AABoucher As for why it uses iterators instead of indices, the short answer is that iterators enable a simple, uniform and very flexible interface for expressing all sorts of algorithms across all container types. If you want a more detailed explanation, you should ask that as a separate question. :) – jalf Mar 29 '13 at 23:23

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