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I am working to create a program where I read in information from a file and assign the information between 4 linked lists. I have create the following structure to represent the information.

struct ListStruct{
  int waitingTime;
  struct ListStruct *next;
};

My question is to do with these typedefs. While the first defines the structure, I am not sure what the second does. It creates a pointer to the struct 'Patron', but does it being typedef'd imply anything that may allow me to easily move between 4 linked lists? If so, what is an effective way to utilize this?

typedef struct ListStruct Patron; 
typedef Patron *ListHeadPtr;
share|improve this question
    
I seriously advise against typedef-ing a pointer-type. The only logical reason for doing so is to avert the mis-typed multi-varaible declaration list. I.e. int* p1, p2 as opposed to intPtr p1, p2;, and honestly even that is a lame reason to do so. Do not fear the asterisk. Embrace them and learn to love them. They're like a giant single-char-red-flag that screams "This is a pointer!". This becomes even more important for code-clarity when reading code with double-indirection (pointers-to-pointers). Everyone has preferences, but in-general hiding asterisks has no concrete benefit. – WhozCraig Mar 30 '13 at 0:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

does it being typedef'd imply anything that may allow me to easily move between 4 linked lists?

No, it's just for convenience.

If so, what is an effective way to utilize this?

You can now pass linked lists into functions, like so:

ListHeadPtr append(ListHeadPtr aList, ListHeadPtr anotherList) {
    ....
}

Addendum

To "cons" an element (i.e. insert it at the start of the list):

ListHeadPtr cons(int waitTime, ListHeadPtr list) {
    ListHeadPtr first = malloc(sizeof(Patron));
    if (first == NULL) {
        /* Take evasive action */
    }
    first->waitingTime = waitTime;
    first->next = list;
    return first;
}
share|improve this answer
    
When creating an item for one of the lists, how would I go about assigning it? At the end of the createPatron function, how would i conclude it? EG: ListHeadPtr = patronPtr (where patronPtr has been malloc'ed before) – user2225940 Mar 29 '13 at 23:08
    
Additionally, how would I be able to declare which list is being worked on? Would I need an additional ListHeadPtr definition? For example ListHeadPtr list1; – user2225940 Mar 29 '13 at 23:14
    
"how would I be able to declare which list is being worked on?" Store it in a variable? – abeln Mar 29 '13 at 23:15
    
The (ListHeadPtr list), what is being sent to that? – user2225940 Mar 29 '13 at 23:18
    
The list you want to add an element to. – abeln Mar 29 '13 at 23:19

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