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I want to work with a rather large corpus. It goes by the name of web 1T-gram. It has about 3 trillion tokens. This is my first time working with redis and I am trying to write all the key:value pairs but its taking too long . My end-goal is to use several redis instances to store the corpus,but, for now, am sticking to writing it all on a single instance.

I am not sure but is there some way to accelerate the writing process ? As of now I am only writing on a single redis instance in a machine with 64G of RAM . I was thinking if there is some cache-size setting which I could maximize to use for redis. Or something on those lines ?

Thanks.

For reference, I have written the code below :

import gzip
import redis
import sys
import os
import time
import gzip
r = redis.StrictRedis(host='localhost',port=6379,db=0)
startTime = time.time()
for l in os.listdir(sys.argv[1]):
        infile = gzip.open(os.path.join(sys.argv[1],l),'rb')
        print l
        for line in infile:
                parts = line.split('\t')
                #print parts[0],' ',parts[1]
                r.set(parts[0],int(parts[1].rstrip('\n')))
r.bgsave()
print time.time() - startTime, ' seconds '

UPDATE :

I read about mass insertion and have been trying to do it but that keeps failing too. Here is the change in script :

def gen_redis_proto(*args):
    proto = ''
    proto += '*' + str(len(args)) + '\r\n'
    for arg in args:
        proto += '$' + str(len(arg)) + '\r\n'
        proto += str(arg) + '\r\n'
    return proto
import sys
import os
import gzip
outputFile = open(sys.argv[2],'w')



for l in os.listdir(sys.argv[1]):
        infile = gzip.open(os.path.join(sys.argv[1],l),'rb')
        for line in infile:
                parts = line.split('\t')
                key = parts[0]
                value = parts[1].rstrip('\n')
                #outputFile.write(gen_redis_proto('SET',key,value))
                print gen_redis_proto('SET',key,value)

        infile.close()
        print 'done with file ',l

The credit for the generation method goes to a github user. i did not write it.

If I run this ,

ERR wrong number of arguments for 'set' command
ERR unknown command '$18'
ERR unknown command 'ESSPrivacyMark'
ERR unknown command '$3'
ERR unknown command '225'
ERR unknown command ' *3'
ERR unknown command '$3'
ERR wrong number of arguments for 'set' command
ERR unknown command '$25'
ERR unknown command 'ESSPrivacyMark'
ERR unknown command '$3'
ERR unknown command '157'
ERR unknown command ' *3'
ERR unknown command '$3'

This goes on and on . The input is of the form

"string" \t count .

Thanks.

2nd UPDATE:

I used pipelining and that did give me a boost. But soon enough it ran out of memory. For reference I have a system with 64 gig of RAM. And I thought it would not run outta memory. The code is below :

import redis
import gzip
import os
import sys
r = redis.Redis(host='localhost',port=6379,db=0)
pipe = r.pipeline(transaction=False)
i = 0
MAX = 10000
ignore = ['3gm-0030.gz','3gm-0063.gz','2gm-0008.gz','3gm-0004.gz','3gm-0022.gz','2gm-0019.gz']
for l in os.listdir(sys.argv[1]):
        if(l in ignore):
                continue
        infile = gzip.open(os.path.join(sys.argv[1],l),'rb')
        print 'doing it for file ',l
        for line in infile:
                parts = line.split('\t')
                key = parts[0]
                value = parts[1].rstrip('\n')
                if(i<MAX):
                        pipe.set(key,value)
                        i=i+1
                else:   
                        pipe.execute()
                        i=0
                        pipe.set(key,value)
                        i=i+1
        infile.close()

Is hashes the way to go ? I thought 64 gig would be enough. And I only gave it a small subset of 2 billion key:value pairs and not the whole thing.

share|improve this question
    
Oh my. Redis only supports 4.3 billion keys. Do you mean 3 billion? –  Pavel Anossov Mar 30 '13 at 0:32
    
In fact, the redis faq states [redis] was tested in practice to handle at least 250 million of keys per instance, so this is scary. –  Pavel Anossov Mar 30 '13 at 0:33
2  
Did you read this document? –  Pavel Anossov Mar 30 '13 at 0:34
    
Oh ! So I am guessing its gonna die with 3 trillion. No, it is 3 trillion, not billion. Thanks for that doc. But I guess its better I look at multiple instances from the beginning itself . –  crazyaboutliv Mar 30 '13 at 0:58
    
What makes you run out of memory: your Python process or the Redis server? It's not clear. Measure with top. –  hcalves Apr 4 '13 at 20:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

What you want is probably not possible in your situation.

According to this page, your dataset is 24 GB compressed with gzip. These file will likely contain a lot of similar text, like a dictionary.

A quick test with the words file from the dict program qields a compression of 3.12x:

> gzip -k -c /usr/share/dict/web2 > words.gz
> du /usr/share/dict/web2  words.gz
2496    /usr/share/dict/web2
800 words.gz
> calc '2496/800'
3.12 /* 3.12 */
> calc '3.12*24'
74.88 /* 7.488e1 */

So your uncompressed data size could easily be more than 64 GB. So even without any overhead for Redis, it would not fit into your RAM even if you used 16-bit unsigned integers to store the counts.

Looking at the examples, most keys are relatively short;

serve as the incoming   92
serve as the incubator  99
serve as the independent    794
serve as the index  223
serve as the indication 72
serve as the indicator  120
serve as the indicators 45
serve as the indispensable  111
serve as the indispensible  40
serve as the individual 234
serve as the industrial 52

You could hash the keys, but it might not save you much on average:

In [1]: from hashlib import md5

In [2]: data = '''serve as the incoming 92
serve as the incubator 99
serve as the independent 794
serve as the index 223
serve as the indication 72
serve as the indicator 120
serve as the indicators 45
serve as the indispensable 111
serve as the indispensible 40
serve as the individual 234
serve as the industrial 52'''

In [3]: lines = data.splitlines()

In [4]: kv = [s.rsplit(None, 1) for s in lines]

In [5]: kv[0:2]
Out[5]: [['serve as the incoming', '92'], ['serve as the incubator', '99']]

In [6]: [len(s[0]) for s in kv]
Out[6]: [21, 22, 24, 18, 23, 22, 23, 26, 26, 23, 23]

In [7]: [len(md5(s[0]).digest()) for s in kv]
Out[7]: [16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16]

For any key shorter than 16 bytes it would actually cost you more space to hash it.

Compressing the strings would generally not save space, even if you disregard the header;

In [1]: import zlib

In [2]: zlib.compress('foo')[:3]
Out[2]: 'x\x9cK'

In [3]: zlib.compress('bar')[:3]
Out[3]: 'x\x9cK'

In [4]: s = 'serve as the indispensable'

In [5]: len(s)
Out[5]: 26

In [6]: len(zlib.compress(s))-3
Out[6]: 31
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So I probably should look at distributing it among a lot of machines. Thanks. –  crazyaboutliv Apr 8 '13 at 7:24
    
It depends on what you plan to do with the corpus once it is in memory. Since the corpys is already divided into (non-overlapping, I'm assuming) files, couldn't you do your research repeatedly with every time a different small part of the corpus? –  Roland Smith Apr 8 '13 at 17:34
    
No, I will have "n" clients pinging asking about the counts from any table. So, I think I cannot . Unless, I first search in redis and in case of a miss, search on disk or something on those lines. –  crazyaboutliv Apr 8 '13 at 19:32

Rather than writing a file of commands, maybe you should use pipelining and perhaps multiprocessing. Using pipelining is pretty simple in redis-py. You'll need to run tests to find the ideal chunk size.

For an example of Py-redis, multiprocessing, and pipelining, check out this example gist

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I have used pipelining and it does give me an improvement. I wanted to ask. My dataset is static and it will be read-only. In that case, making pipe(transaction=False) is safe right ? That will not cause any loss of data I guess as I am not reading right now, only writing. Want to confirm as am a complete redis newbie –  crazyaboutliv Apr 2 '13 at 0:27
    
It shouldn't cause any data loss, but it could cause a performance decrease. I know it sounds counter intuitive but according to some testing I've done and seen from others you're likely to see better performance with it on. I'd recommend running a relatively small subset for testing with and without to see how your particular pattern performs in both cases. –  The Real Bill Apr 8 '13 at 17:47

I would definitely go with hashes since top level keys have overhead as they store additional data you might not need (e.g. TTL...).

Also redis.io site has some performance tricks and Jerremy Zawodny stored 1.2 billion key/valuy pairs a while ago.

share|improve this answer

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