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I'm attempting to create a daily time series dataset from what is currently observed only periodically. I can successfully perform the desired operation for a single case but can't work out how to scale to the entire dataset. For example:

        UNIT <- c(100,100, 200, 200, 200, 200, 200, 300, 300, 300,300)
        STATUS <- c('ACTIVE','INACTIVE','ACTIVE','ACTIVE','INACTIVE','ACTIVE','INACTIVE','ACTIVE','ACTIVE',
                    'ACTIVE','INACTIVE') 
        TERMINATED <- as.Date(c('1999-07-06' , '2008-12-05' , '2000-08-18' , '2000-08-18' ,'2000-08-18' ,'2008-08-18',
                        '2008-08-18','2006-09-19','2006-09-19' ,'2006-09-19' ,'1999-03-15')) 
        START <- as.Date(c('2007-04-23','2008-12-06','2004-06-01','2007-02-01','2008-04-19','2010-11-29','2010-12-30',
                   '2007-10-29','2008-02-05','2008-06-30','2009-02-07'))
        STOP <- as.Date(c('2008-12-05','2012-12-31','2007-01-31','2008-04-18','2010-11-28','2010-12-29','2012-12-31',
                  '2008-02-04','2008-06-29','2009-02-06','2012-12-31'))
        TEST <- data.frame(UNIT,STATUS,TERMINATED,START,STOP)
        TEST                   

Which is observations on units over intervals:

   UNIT   STATUS TERMINATED      START       STOP
1   100   ACTIVE 1999-07-06 2007-04-23 2008-12-05
2   100 INACTIVE 2008-12-05 2008-12-06 2012-12-31
3   200   ACTIVE 2000-08-18 2004-06-01 2007-01-31
4   200   ACTIVE 2000-08-18 2007-02-01 2008-04-18
5   200 INACTIVE 2000-08-18 2008-04-19 2010-11-28
6   200   ACTIVE 2008-08-18 2010-11-29 2010-12-29
7   200 INACTIVE 2008-08-18 2010-12-30 2012-12-31
8   300   ACTIVE 2006-09-19 2007-10-29 2008-02-04
9   300   ACTIVE 2006-09-19 2008-02-05 2008-06-29
10  300   ACTIVE 2006-09-19 2008-06-30 2009-02-06
11  300 INACTIVE 1999-03-15 2009-02-07 2012-12-31            

I'd like to take each unit and duplicate the values on "STATUS" and "TERMINATE" (along with N other covariates in the large dataset) daily, over the entire range of the START and END dates. Doing it for a single record....

        A <-  seq(TEST$START[1], TEST$STOP[1], "days") #vector of relevant date sequences 

        #keeping the old data, now with daily date "fill" 
        B <- matrix(NA, length(A), dim(TEST[-c(4,5)])[2]) 
        C <- data.frame(A,B)

        #carry forward observations on covariates through date range 
        TEST[-c(4,5)][1,]  #note terminated has the proper date status:
        UNIT STATUS TERMINATED
         1  100 ACTIVE 1999-07-06

        #now the TERMINATED loses its 'date' status for some reason
        C[-c(1)][1,] <- TEST[-c(4,5)][1,] 
        D <-  na.locf(C)
        colnames(D)[2:4] <-colnames(TEST)[1:3]
        colnames(D)[1] <- "DATE"
        head(D)

        DATE UNIT STATUS TERMINATED
1 2007-04-23  100      1      10778
2 2007-04-24  100      1      10778
3 2007-04-25  100      1      10778
4 2007-04-26  100      1      10778
5 2007-04-27  100      1      10778
6 2007-04-28  100      1      10778

The observations for the first row are duplicated over the range of START to END and a new vector is created: a daily time series for the entire period. I would like to do this for row 2, bind it to D and so on by UNIT of analysis. I have written a for loop with na.locf in an unsuccessful attempt to generalize:

for(i in 1:nrow(TEST)){
  for(j in 0:nrow(TEST)-1) {
  A <-  seq(TEST$START[i], TEST$STOP[i], "days")

  B <- matrix(NA, length(A), dim(TEST[-c(4,5)])[2])
  C <- data.frame(A,B)

  C[-c(1)][1,] <- TEST[-c(4,5)][i,] 
  assign(paste("D",i, sep=""),na.locf(C)) 

  #below here the code does not work. R does not recognize i and j as I intend
  #I haven't been able to overcome this using assign, evaluate etc. 
  colnames(Di)[2:4] <-colnames(TEST)[1:3]
  colnames(Di)[1] <- "DATE"

  D0 <- matrix(NA, 1, dim(Di)[2])
  assign(paste("D", j, sep = ""),Dj)
  rbind(Di,Dj)

   }
  }            

The obvious problem with the single record "solution" is dealing with the "TERMINATED" Date. Just prior to using na.locf it loses it's Date status.

I'm hoping there is a much better way of looking at this and I have just buried myself in complication out of ignorance.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is relatively easy to do in SQL, so you can use sqldf, which treats data.frames as SQL tables.

dates <- data.frame( date = seq.Date( min(TEST$START), max(TEST$STOP), by = 1 ) )
library(sqldf)
result <- sqldf( "
  SELECT *
  FROM TEST, dates
  WHERE START <= date AND date <= STOP
" )
head( result )

If the data is large, it may be worthwhile to store the data in a database, and do the computations there.

# With SQLite, a database is just a file
library(RSQLite)
connection <- dbConnect( SQLite(), "/tmp/test.db" )  

# Copy the data.frames to the "Test" and "Dates" table.
# When transfering data across systems, it is often easier 
# to convert dates to strings.
convert_dates <- function(d) {
  as.data.frame( lapply( 
    d, 
    function(u) if( "Date" %in% class(u) ) as.character(u) else u 
  ) ) 
}
dbWriteTable(connection, "Test",  convert_dates(TEST),  row.names = FALSE )
dbWriteTable(connection, "Dates", convert_dates(dates), row.names = FALSE )

# Check how many rows the query has: it could be 
# that the result does not fit in memory
dbGetQuery( connection, "
  SELECT COUNT(*) 
  FROM   Test, Dates 
  WHERE  start <= date AND date <= stop
" )

# If it is reasonable, retrieve all the data
dbGetQuery( connection, "
  SELECT * 
  FROM   Test, Dates 
  WHERE  start <= date AND date <= stop
" )

# If not, only retrieve what you need
dbGetQuery( connection, "
  SELECT * 
  FROM   Test, Dates 
  WHERE  start <= date AND date <= stop
  AND    '2013-04-01' <= date AND date <= '2013-04-30'
" )
share|improve this answer
    
great, thanks! This is a really useful package for data management. –  hubert_farnsworth Mar 31 '13 at 1:55
    
any tips on using this package with a big data frame? I'm currently getting the 'can't allocate vector of size N' problem –  hubert_farnsworth Mar 31 '13 at 22:48
    
If the data is too large, you can do everything in the database: I have updated my answer accordingly. (But the volume of data may be explained by some dates very far in the future, e.g., 4712-12-31 in your example.) –  Vincent Zoonekynd Apr 1 '13 at 9:28
    
thanks! That was a typo in the STOP vector, which I've now changed to 2012-12-31. I think the result will be atleast 1million rows of data. I suspect the result just doesn't fit in memory, so I might need to go to the cloud. The solution you suggest runs on my toy example using my Mac but the big database is stored on a windows server and I get the following error after 'connection' Error in sqliteNewConnection(drv, ...) : RS-DBI driver: (could not connect to dbname: unable to open database file Any idea where this comes from? I can't find anything in the package manual. –  hubert_farnsworth Apr 1 '13 at 23:41
    
It means that the file /tmp/test.db cannot be created, because there is no /tmp directory. Just change the file name. –  Vincent Zoonekynd Apr 2 '13 at 6:38

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