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Take for example this HTML:

<td onclick="$(this).html('Wanted HTML: <br>; Unwanted HTML: &lt;script&gt;alert(&#39;xss&#39;)&lt;/script&gt;')">
Click to Show</td>

As you can see, I have already escaped (using PHP) the unwanted HTML to entities. But when you click the box it executes the JavaScript.

If I change .html to .text, it displays the line breaks literally as well.

How can I have it show the the <br>s as line breaks, but the &lt;s and &gt;s as literally less than and greater than signs when you click the box?

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What is this code supposed to do? Why are you trying to output JavaScript from other JavaScript? –  woz Mar 30 '13 at 2:49
    
@woz I think that is being an example of somebody hacking his form input. –  Dave Mar 30 '13 at 2:51
    
It's supposed to replace the td's content when you click on it (onclick="$(this).html('...). The point is I'm trying to make it not output JavaScript from other JavaScript - that's what it's currently doing. –  duncan Mar 30 '13 at 2:51
    
Oh, I see. Sorry, I missed the XSS tag. –  woz Mar 30 '13 at 2:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that your characters are being decoded in the onclick, before they reach the JavaScript function.

You need to double-encode. So your example would become:

<td onclick="$(this).html('Wanted HTML: &lt;br&gt;; Unwanted HTML: &amp;lt;script&amp;gt;alert(&amp;#39;xss&amp;#39;)&amp;lt;/script&amp;gt;')">
    Click to Show
</td>

Notice that I encoded (single encoded) the tags you do want. I also added the missing semicolon on the first &gt;.

Of course the better solution is to remove this from the HTML entirely. Most developers agree that JavaScript is for interactivity and HTML is for content, and they should mix as little as possible (with the JavaScript hooking into the content with calls such as addEventHandler)

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Thanks very much, that worked :) –  duncan Mar 30 '13 at 2:53
    
The example was abbreviated - the way I am actually using this is that a TD has a very large amount of text, and so it shortens it and lets you click on it to expand to the entire message. –  duncan Mar 30 '13 at 2:57
    
@DuncanNZ then the better (or at least more-pure) solution is to have a hidden div with the full content, and a generic JavaScript function which swaps around the short div for the long div for a specified area. –  Dave Mar 30 '13 at 2:59
    
Good idea, I'll do that instead –  duncan Mar 30 '13 at 3:02
    
@DuncanNZ Note that your code is also vulnerable to backslash errors. For example, if the user ended their input with a backslash, it would become invalid. Or less malicious: backslashes in the content will disappear. So to be safe you also need to addslashes if you keep this method. –  Dave Mar 30 '13 at 3:02

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