Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a std::map<int, std::vector<SomeStruct>>,
and provide a query like std::vector<SomeStruct> FindData(int key).

To prevent copying the whole data, I modify it to be std::vector<SomeStruct>& FindData(int key).
But, there will be no data for certain key, so sometimes I have nothing to return.
In that case, I declare a file scope variable that is an empty std::vector<SomeStruct> and return it.

But if I choose the pointer to vector, that is std::vector<SomeStruct>* FindData(int key) then I can just return NULL for non-existing key.

Which one is better?
I learned that pointer to std::vector is bad(or weird? not sure) in the question (Is there other syntax for this pointer operation?)
And I personally like reference to std::vector too, so that I can use operator[] easier, but the drawback is I have to declare an additional empty variable for it.

Code example are like: In SomeClass.h

typedef std::vector<SomeStruct> DataVec;
typedef std::map<int, DataVec> DataMap;
DataMap m_DataMap;

Now In SomeClass.cpp:

Case 1:

namespace
{
    DataVec EmptyVector;
}

DataVec& FindDatas(int key)
{
    DataMap::iterator It = m_DataMap.find(key);

    if (It == m_DataMap.end()) return EmptyVec;

    return It->second;
}

Case 2:

DataVec* FindDatas(int key)
{
    DataMap::iterator It = m_DataMap.find(key);

    if (It == m_DataMap.end()) return NULL;

    return &(It->second);
}

Reference:
Pros: looks like normal std::vector.
Cons: Additional variable declared.

Pointer:
Pros: Shorter query function and no need other variable.
Cons: looks weird(?!), and you can't juse p[i], you have to (*p)[i], which is annoying.

Which one is better?

share|improve this question
    
Return a reference; a default constructed vector is a lightweight object, so having that additional EmptyVector around shouldn't be any cause for concern. If you return nullptr all client code will have to include a check for that, which I personally find more annoying than checking for an empty vector. –  Praetorian Mar 30 '13 at 3:45
    
@Praetorian: I got similar thought, that's why I prefer reference. But client has to check for if (p.empty()) return as well, so maybe the null-check like statements still exists :( –  Marson Mao Mar 30 '13 at 4:43

3 Answers 3

You can also give the reference of output as a parameter, so that you can add some enumerator or bool result as a method output:

    namespace
    {
        DataVec EmptyVector;
    }

    bool FindDatas(int key, DataVec& output)
    {
        DataMap::iterator It = m_DataMap.find(key);

        if (It == m_DataMap.end()) return false;

        output = It->second;
                    return true;
    }
share|improve this answer

It depends on your design requirements. If calling this function with an index that doesn't have a corresponding element is a programming error, then the code should abort. If it's a user error, it should throw an exception. If it's part of the expected usage, then you have three alternatives, again depending on your design. You can flag the problem, typically by returning a null pointer or returning a Boolean value from a function that takes a reference for the result. You can quietly return a newly created valid object, as std::set does. You can return a sentinel object that isn't part of your container, and users will have to check whether that's what they got before they use the returned value.

share|improve this answer

If you don't mind creating new entries for unfound keys then you can use this code:

DataVec& FindDatas(int key)
{
    return m_DataMap[key];
}

An alternative approach that avoids new entries for unfound keys:

DataVec& FindDatas(int key)
{
    DataMap::iterator It = m_DataMap.find(key);    
    if (It == m_DataMap.end()) {
        // created on first unfound key and stays
        // alive until the end of the program
        static DataVec fEmpty; 
        return fEmpty; 
    }    
    return It->second;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi: I dont want to introduce extra entry on non-existing key, thanks! –  Marson Mao Mar 30 '13 at 3:42
    
@MarsonMao Ok, I posted an alternative solution. –  StackedCrooked Mar 30 '13 at 3:46
    
Consider FindDatas(non_existing_key).push_back(blah). (the same problem exists in the original code, though) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 30 '13 at 3:47
    
@StackedCrooked: I got this idea, but I dont want to put static variable inside function, since I'm having a lot of these query-funcs, it will put many statics around, which is not a desired result. Thanks! –  Marson Mao Mar 30 '13 at 4:40
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: yes I noticed that too, I will use const return value instead, but generally I dont dp things like push_back in your example. –  Marson Mao Mar 30 '13 at 4:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.