Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my example program:

what = {:banana=>:fruit, :pear=>:fruit, :sandal=>:fruit, :panda=>:fruit, :apple=>:fruit}

what.map do |w| 
    p "is this right?"
    awesome_print w
    fix = gets
    fix.chop!
    if (fix == "N")
        p "Tell me what it should be"
        correction = gets
        w[1] = correction.chop!.to_sym
    end
    p w
end

I run it, and I get this (my input included):

"is this right?"
[
    [0] :banana,
    [1] :fruit
]
Y
[:banana, :fruit]
"is this right?"
[
    [0] :pear,
    [1] :fruit
]
Y
[:pear, :fruit]
"is this right?"
[
    [0] :sandal,
    [1] :fruit
]
N
"Tell me what it should be"
footwear
[:sandal, :footwear]
"is this right?"
[
    [0] :panda,
    [1] :fruit
]
N
"Tell me what it should be"
animal
[:panda, :animal]
"is this right?"
[
    [0] :apple,
    [1] :fruit
]
Y
[:apple, :fruit]
=> [[:banana, :fruit], [:pear, :fruit], [:sandal, :footwear], [:panda, :animal], [:apple, :fruit]]
>> what
=> {:banana=>:fruit, :pear=>:fruit, :sandal=>:fruit, :panda=>:fruit, :apple=>:fruit}

My question is how can I change the Hash? irb tells me when I run the program that each enumerated element is processed, but the results aren't saved in my hash what.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to mutate the hash in place (as you seem to want), simply do this:

my_hash.each do |key,value|       # map would work just as well, but not needed
  my_hash[key] = some_new_value    
end

If you want to create a new hash, without changing the original:

new_hash = Hash[ my_hash.map do |key,value|
  [ key, new_value ]
end ]

The way this works is that Enumerable#map returns an array (in this case an array of two-element key/value pairs), and Hash.[] can turn [ [a,b], [c,d] ] into { a=>b, c=>d }.

What you were doing—hash.map{ … }—was mapping each key/value pair to a new value and creating an array…and then doing nothing with that array. While there is Array#map! which will destructively mutate an array in place, there is no equivalent Hash#map! to destructively mutate a hash in a single step.


Note also that if you want to destructively mutate a Hash—or any other object that references other mutable objects—in place you can just destructively mutate those objects during normal iteration:

# A simple hash with mutable strings as values (not symbols)
h = { a:"zeroth", b:"first", c:"second", d:"third" }

# Mutate each string value
h.each.with_index{ |(char,str),index| str[0..-3] = index.to_s }

p h #=> {:a=>"0th", :b=>"1st", :c=>"2nd", :d=>"3rd"}

However, since you are using symbols for the values in your sample code—and since symbols are not mutable—this final note does not directly apply there.

share|improve this answer

Instead of:

w[1] = correction.chop!.to_sym

Try assigning to the hash directly:

what[w[0]] = correction.chop!.to_sym

Ruby is creating that w array just to pass you the key and value. Assigning to that array isn't going to change your hash; it's only changing that temporary array.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.