Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

For a school project I am supposed to implement a simplified version of the UNIX filesystem using only linked list structures. I am currently having a problem with my mkfs() function, which is supposed to simply initialize a filesystem.

My header file that creates the structures I am using is here:

typedef struct Lines {
  char line[82];
  struct Lines *next;
} Lines;

typedef struct Node {
  char *name;
  int id;
  struct Node *parent;
  struct Node *next;
  union {
    char line[82];
    struct Node *children;
  } contents;
} Node;

typedef struct Filesystem {
  char  *name;
  struct Node *root;
  struct Node *current;
} Filesystem;

Here is the method in my separate file which #includes this header file:

void mkfs(Filesystem *files) {
  Node *root = NULL; /* Creates a pointer to the directory we will use as
                      * the root directory for this filesystem*/

  files = (Filesystem *)malloc(sizeof(*files)); /* Allocates space for the the 
                             * filesystem structure */

  if(files == NULL){ /* If there is no memory available, prints error message
                      * and does nothing else */

    printf("Memory allocation failed!\n");

   } else {

    root = (Node *)malloc(sizeof(*root)); /* Allocates space for the root 
                   * directory of the filesystem. */


    if(root == NULL) { /* If there is no memory available, prints error
        * message and frees memory obtained thus far, but then 
        * does nothing else */

      printf("Memory allocation failed!\n");
      free(files);

    } else {

  /* Allocates space for the root directory's name string */
      root->name= (char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*(strlen("/")+1));

      if(root->name == NULL) { /* If there is no memory available, prints error
            * message and frees memory obtained thus far, 
            * but then does nothing else */

    printf("Memory allocation failed!\n");

    free(files);
    free(root);

      } else {

    root->name = "/"; /* Defines the root directory as being named by the
           * forward slash */ /* DO STR CPY HERE ITS CHANGING THE ADDRESS */
    root->contents.children = NULL;
    root->next = NULL;
    root->parent = NULL; /* UHH CHECK ON THIS NOOO CLUE IF ITS RIGHT FUUU*/

    files->root = root; /* The filesystems pointer to a directory is set 
             * to point to the root directory we just allocated
             * space for and set up */

    files->current = root; /* Sets the filesystems current directory to
            * point to the root directory as well, because 
            * it is the only directory in existence for this
            * filesystem at this point. */
      }
    }
  }
}

The problem I am having is that when I run gdb and step through each line, the last two assignment lines ARE NOT CHANGING the contents of file->root and file->current. For example, here I print the contents of files->root, run the line files->root = root, and then print again, and you can see the address has not changed. However if I just print root, the thing I am trying to assign it to, it clearly has a different value that files->root SHOULD have been set to:

(gdb) print files->root
$12 = (struct Node *) 0x400660
(gdb) step
(gdb) print files->root
$13 = (struct Node *) 0x400660
(gdb) print root
$14 = (Node *) 0x602030

Does anyone have any idea as to why an assignment might not work in this case? This is currently ruining my whole project, so any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!!!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like your mkfs function is accepting a pointer to an already-existing Filesystem and then you are trying to allocate memory for a new Filesystem at a new memory location. There are two common conventions for a function like this: either it accepts no parameters and returns a pointer to a struct, or it accepts a pointer to an already-allocated struct and populates that struct. The reason it appears like the data isn't changing is that you're actually creating and populating a second struct, and leaving the caller's struct unchanged.

Here's an example of the first case, simplifying the function to just the memory allocation part:

Filesystem * mkfs() {
    Filesystem *files = (Filesystem *)malloc(sizeof(Filesystem));

    // (error handing omitted for brevity)

    // populate the files struct as appropriate...
    Node *root = (Node *)malloc(sizeof(Node));
    files->root = root;
    // etc, etc as you currently have

    return files;
}

// In this case you should also provide a way for the caller to free a filesystem,
// which will free everything you allocated during mkfs:
void freefs(Filessystem *files) {

    // first free any buffers you allocated inside the struct. For example:
    free(files->root);

    // then free the main filesystem struct
    free(files);
}

The caller then deals with this object using these two functions. For example:

int main() {
    Filesystem *files = mkfs();
    // now "files" is ready to use
    freefs(files); // free the objects when we're done with them.
}

Here's an example of the second case, which assumes that the caller already allocated an appropriate buffer, and it just needs to be populated:

void mkfs(Filesystem *files) {

    // populate the files struct as appropriate...
    Node *root = (Node *)malloc(sizeof(Node));
    files->root = root;
    // etc, etc as you currently have

}

void freefs(Filesystem *files) {
    // still need to clean up all of the ancillary objects
    free(files->root);
    // etc, etc
}

In this case the calling function has some more work to do. For example:

int main() {
    Filesystem *files = (Filesystem *)malloc(sizeof(Filesystem));
    mkfs(files);
    // now "files" is ready to use
    freefs(files); // free the objects when we're done with them.
}

Both patterns are valid; the former is useful if you expect that the caller will need to be able to control how memory is allocated. For example, the caller might decide to allocate the filesystem on the stack rather than the heap:

int main() {
    Filesystem files;
    mkfs(&files);
    // now "files" is ready to use
    freefs(&files); // free the ancillary objects when we're done with them.
    // "files" is still allocated here, but it's no longer valid
}

The latter takes care of the allocation on behalf of the caller. Since your function allocates further structures on the heap it's necessary to include a cleanup function in both cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Well the function definition was given to me by the teacher so I have to follow it. The testing code is doing this in its main method: Filesystem filesystem; mkfs(&filesystem); – Frank Cangialosi Mar 30 '13 at 4:18
    
I can't get around that, that's the way the tests are defined. – Frank Cangialosi Mar 30 '13 at 4:19
    
If the teacher is telling you to pass in the pointer then that forces you to take the second path. (I published the answer before I'd really finished it; I'm sorry for the confusion.) One of my examples towards the end shows the same setup you have in your assignment, with the caller allocating the filesystem on the stack and passing it in to the mkfs function. – Martin Atkins Mar 30 '13 at 4:22
    
Okay well I am not allowed to change the main method (which is exactly that very last piece of code you wrote), and I am not allowed to change the function declaration. So are you saying if the main makes this kind of call, I do not need to do any allocation once I get into mkfs()? – Frank Cangialosi Mar 30 '13 at 4:28
    
The freefs thing is good style (to avoid memory leaks) but not necessary for an academic assignment, so don't worry about it. But yes, if main passes in a pointer to a buffer then you don't need to allocate another one, you can just assign into that buffer directly. – Martin Atkins Mar 30 '13 at 4:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.