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i have a form with the following fields inputUser,inputEmail,inputPhoneNo,inputPassword,inputConfirmPassword and one button with createRegistration

when ever on the blur condition the message should be displayed but is not displaying. when i click the createRegistration button the form is not validating.still i makes a ajax request.

function validateForm(){

        $('#registerForm').validate({
        rules: {
          inputUser: {
            minlength: 2,
            required: true
          },
          inputEmail: {
            required: true,
            email: true
          },
          inputPhoneNo: {
            minlength: 2,
            required: true
          },
          inputPassword: {
            minlength: 5,
            required: true
          },
          inputConfirmPassword: {
            minlength: 5,
            required: true,
            equalTo: "#RinputPassword"
          }

        },
            highlight: function(element) {
                $(element).closest('.control-group').removeClass('success').addClass('error');
            },
            success: function(element) {
                element
                .text('OK!').addClass('valid')
                .closest('.control-group').removeClass('error').addClass('success');
            }
      });


}


$(document).ready(function() {
$('#createRegistration').click(


        function(){
            validateForm();         
            var post = $(this).attr("name") + "=" + $(this).val();


            // get form key value pairs 
           $queryString=$('#registerForm').serialize()+ "&" + post;


        $.post(
            'Registration.cgi',
            $queryString,
            function(data,status){
                var activationPattern = /activate/g;
                var EmailPattern = /Email/g;


                  if(activationPattern.test(data)) {
                      $('#RmailActivation').addClass("alert alert-sucess");
                      $('#RmailActivationSpan').html(data);
                  }else if(EmailPattern.test(data)){
                      $('#Remail').addClass("error");
                      $('#RemailError').html(data);
                  }else{
                      $('#Ruser').addClass("error");
                      $('#RuserError').html(data);
                  }
              }

        );

        });

});
share|improve this question
    
consider adding an example jsfiddle including your html. –  ethorn10 Mar 30 '13 at 4:31
    
Try this jsfiddle.net/FkKUS/3 –  Subodh Ghulaxe Mar 30 '13 at 5:49
add comment

2 Answers

You have a few popular issues and misconceptions regarding this plugin:

  • .validate() is the plugin's initialization, not a method to repeatedly call to test the form's validity. Instead, .validate() should be called once within the DOM ready event handler. Then once initialized, the form is tested automatically using its various built-in events.

  • You do not need a click handler. The click event of the submit button is automatically captured by the plugin.

  • As per the docs, you are supposed to put your ajax within the plugin's submitHandler callback option.

submitHandler: Callback, Default: default (native) form submit

Callback for handling the actual submit when the form is valid. Gets the form as the only argument. Replaces the default submit. The right place to submit a form via Ajax after it validated.

Assuming your ajax is written properly, re-arrange your code into something more like this:

$(document).ready(function () {

    $('#registerForm').validate({
        rules: {
            inputUser: {
                minlength: 2,
                required: true
            },
            inputEmail: {
                required: true,
                email: true
            },
            inputPhoneNo: {
                minlength: 2,
                required: true
            },
            inputPassword: {
                minlength: 5,
                required: true
            },
            inputConfirmPassword: {
                minlength: 5,
                required: true,
                equalTo: "#RinputPassword"
            }
        },
        highlight: function (element) {
            $(element).closest('.control-group').removeClass('success').addClass('error');
        },
        success: function (element) {
            element.text('OK!').addClass('valid')
                .closest('.control-group').removeClass('error').addClass('success');
        },
        submitHandler: function (form) {
            var post = $('#createRegistration').attr("name") + "=" + $('#createRegistration').val();
            $queryString = $(form).serialize() + "&" + post;
            $.post(
                'Registration.cgi',
            $queryString,
            function (data, status) {
                var activationPattern = /activate/g;
                var EmailPattern = /Email/g;
                if (activationPattern.test(data)) {
                    $('#RmailActivation').addClass("alert alert-sucess");
                    $('#RmailActivationSpan').html(data);
                } else if (EmailPattern.test(data)) {
                    $('#Remail').addClass("error");
                    $('#RemailError').html(data);
                } else {
                    $('#Ruser').addClass("error");
                    $('#RuserError').html(data);
                }
            });
            return false;  // required (when using ajax) for blocking a regular submit
        }
    });

});

Very simple DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/jMdWY/

The same demo using a <button></button> in place of a <input type="submit"/>: http://jsfiddle.net/jMdWY/2/

share|improve this answer
    
but i used button as <button type="button" id="createRegistration" name="createRegistration"> –  pavan Mar 30 '13 at 4:49
    
@pavan, yes, as long as it's inside the <form></form>, you can. See: jsfiddle.net/jMdWY/1 –  Sparky Mar 30 '13 at 4:51
    
@pavan, also note my edits: The $(this) selector inside the submitHandler has to be updated to properly target your button. –  Sparky Mar 30 '13 at 4:57
add comment

Try following code

HTML

<form id="registerForm" onsubmit="return false;">
    <label>Username:</label><input type="text" name="inputUser" />
    <br/>
    <label>Email:</label><input type="text" name="inputEmail" />
    <br/>
    <label>Phone No:</label><input type="text" name="inputPhoneNo" />
    <br/>
    <label>Password:</label><input type="text" name="inputPassword" id="RinputPassword"/>
    <br/>
    <label>Confirm Password:</label><input type="text" name="inputConfirmPassword" />
    <br/>
    <input type="submit" id="createRegistration"/>
</form>

JS

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('#registerForm').validate({ // initialize the plugin
        rules: {
            inputUser: {
                required: true,
                minlength: 2
            },
            inputEmail: {
                required: true,
                email: true
            },
            inputPhoneNo: {
                required: true,
                minlength: 2
            },
            inputPassword: {
                required: true,
                minlength: 5
            },
            inputConfirmPassword: {
                required: true,
                minlength: 5,
                equalTo: "#RinputPassword"
            }
        },
    });


    $("#createRegistration").click(function(){
        var queryString = $('#registerForm').serialize();
        alert(queryString);
        // Add your AJAX request here
    });
});

Live Demo : http://jsfiddle.net/FkKUS/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to the click handler, your ajax submit bypasses validation entirely. In other words, nothing is stopping the ajax from submitting an invalid form. That's why we have a submitHandler callback function built into the plugin. As per the docs, that's where you're supposed to put the ajax. And you don't need a click handler since that event is already captured by the plugin. –  Sparky Mar 30 '13 at 16:37
    
And what's with the onsubmit="return false;" inside the <form>? jQuery makes this kind of sloppy inline JavaScript obsolete. –  Sparky Mar 30 '13 at 16:41
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