Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created an array as follows

while (defined ($line = `<STDIN>`))

        {
        chomp ($line);
        push @stack,($line);
        }

each line has two numbers.

15 6
2  8

how do iterate over each item in each line?

i.e. I want to print

15
6
2
8

I understand it's something like

foreach (@{stack}) (@stack){

    print "?????
}

This is where I am stuck.

share|improve this question
4  
Don't understand how what you want to print is different from what you've got. Also, those backticks don't look right. –  user181548 Oct 15 '09 at 10:33
1  
Ditto on the backtics. Remove them and use while (my $line = <>). –  Sinan Ünür Oct 15 '09 at 12:07
    
while(my $line=<>) gets automatically converted to while(defined(my $line=<>)) –  Brad Gilbert Oct 16 '09 at 19:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

See the perldsc documentation. That's the Perl Data Structures Cookbook, which has examples for dealing with arrays of arrays. From what you're doing though, it doesn't look like you need an array of arrays.

For your problem of taking two numbers per line and outputting one number per line, just turn the whitespace into newlines:

 while( <> ) {
     s/\s+/\n/; # turn all whitespace runs into newlines
     print;     # it's ready to print
     }

With Perl 5.10, you can use the new \h character class that matches only horizontal whitespace:

 while( <> ) {
     s/\h+/\n/; # turn all horizontal whitespace runs into newlines
     print;     # it's ready to print
     }

As a Perl one-liner, that's just:

 % perl -pe 's/\h+/\n/' file.txt
share|improve this answer
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

while ( my $data = <DATA> ) {
    my @values = split ' ', $data;
    print $_, "\n" for @values;
}


__DATA__
15 6
2  8

Output:

C:\Temp> h
15
6
2
8

Alternatively, if you want to store each line in @stack and print out later:

my @stack = map { [ split ] } grep { chomp; length } <DATA>;

The line above slurps everything coming from the DATA filehandle into a list of lines (because <DATA> happens in list context). The grep chomps each line and filters by length after chomping (to avoid getting any trailing empty lines in the data file -- you can avoid it if there are none). The map then splits each line along spaces, and then creates an anonymous array reference for each line. Finally, such array references are stored in each element of @stack. You might want to use Data::Dumper to look at @stack to understand what's going on.

print join("\n", @$_), "\n" for @stack;

Now, we look over each entry in stack, dereferencing each array in turn, then joining the elements of each array with newlines to print one element per line.

Output:

C:\Temp> h
15
6
2
8

The long way of writing essentially the same thing (with less memory consumption) would be:

my @stack;

while ( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    last unless $line =~ /\S/;
    my @values = split ' ', $line;
    push @stack, \@values;
}

for my $ref ( @stack ) {
    print join("\n", @$ref), "\n";
}

Finally, if you wanted do something other than printing all values, say, sum all the numbers, you should store one value per element of @stack:

use List::Util qw( sum );

my @stack;

while ( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    last unless $line =~ /\S/;
    my @values = split ' ', $line;
    push @stack, @values;
}

printf "The sum is %d\n", sum @stack;
share|improve this answer
#!/usr/bin/perl

while ($line = <STDIN>) {
    chomp ($line);
    push @stack, $line;
}

# prints each line
foreach $line (@stack) {
    print "$line\n";
}

# splits each line into items using ' ' as separator
# and prints the items
foreach $line (@stack) {
    @items = split / /, $line;

    foreach $item (@items) {
        print $item . "\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does the final 'for' need to be 'foreach' also? –  dave Oct 15 '09 at 10:49
    
Foreach would have been more easy to understand for sure, from perldoc perlsyn: > The "foreach" keyword is actually a synonym for the "for" keyword, so you can use "foreach" for readability or "for" for brevity. –  RC. Oct 15 '09 at 11:18
1  
foreach and for behave identically. Many perlers prefer to use for exclusively. –  hobbs Oct 15 '09 at 11:19
1  
I used to be a big fan of foreach. Now I have forgotten that it even exists. (Or maybe I've just "for" that it even exists...) –  jrockway Oct 15 '09 at 11:23
2  
How to do what? You're code is just what I did, with just a lot more work. No one has even shown a single reference in any code yet. –  brian d foy Oct 15 '09 at 11:55

I use 'for' for "C" style loops, and 'foreach' for iterating over lists.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no need to make such an artificial distinction between the two. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 15 '09 at 12:08
    
There is no need, but that's what I do too. It's just syntactic sugar. –  Ether Oct 15 '09 at 16:58
    
I use for for both. C style loops will be written with loop in Perl6, and foreach will get renamed to for –  Brad Gilbert Oct 16 '09 at 19:30
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
open IN, "< read.txt" or
    die "Can't read in 'read.txt'!";

my $content = join '', <IN>;

while ($content =~ m`(\d+)`g) {
    print "$1\n";
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.