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I want to replace some words without using external libraries. My first attempt was to make a copy of the string, but it was not efficient, so this is another attempt where I use addresses:

void ReplaceString(std::string &subject, const std::string &search, const std::string &replace) 
{
    size_t position = 0;
    while ((position = subject.find(search, position)) != std::string::npos)    //if something messes up --> failure
    {
         subject.replace(position, search.length(), replace);
         position = position + replace.length();
    }
}

Because this is not very efficient either, I want to use another thing, but I got stuck; I want to use a function like replace_stuff(std::string & a); with a single parameter using string.replace() and string.find() (parsing it with a for loop or something) and then make use of std::map <std::string,std::string>; which is very convenient for me.

I want to use it for a large number of input words. (let's say replacing many bad words with some harmless ones)

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Don't be down on yourself. For what you're doing this is actually much cleaner than you may first think, especially for someone only doing this in C++ for a few months. – WhozCraig Mar 30 '13 at 6:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You might create a class, say Replacer:

class Replacer 
{
  std::map<std::string,> replacement;

public:
  Replacer()
  {
     // init the map here
     replacement.insert ( std::pair<std::string,std::string>("C#","C++") );
     //...
  }
  void replace_stuff(std::string & a);
}

Then the replace_stuff definition would be very similar to your original ReplaceString (it would use map entries instead of the passed parameters).

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The problem with your question is the lack of the necessary components in the Standard library. If you want an efficient implementation, you'd probably need a trie for efficient lookups. Writing one as part of the answer would be way to much code.

If you use a std::map or, if C++11 is available in your environment, a std::unordered_map, you will need to utilitize additional information about the input string and the search-replace pairs from the map. You'd then tokenize the string and check each token if it has to be replaced. Using positions pointing in the input string is a good idea since it avoids copying data. Which brings us to:

Efficiency will depend on memory access (reads and writes), so you should not modify the input string. Create the output by starting with an empty string and by appending pieces from the input. Check each part of the input: If it is a word, check if it needs to be replaced or if it is appended to the output unmodified. If it is not part of a word, append it unmodified.

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It sounds like you want to replace all the "bad" words in a string with harmless ones, but your current implementation is inefficient because the list of bad words is much larger than the length of your input string (subject). Is this correct?

If so, the following code should make it more efficient. As you can see, I had to pass the map as a parameter, but if your function is going to be part of a class, you don't need to do so.

void ReplaceString(std::string &subject, const std::map<std::string, std::string>& replace_map) 
{
    size_t startofword = 0, endofword = 0;
    while(startofword < subject.size())
    {
      size_t length = std::string::npos;

      //get next word in string
      endofword = subject.find_first_of(" ", startofword);
      if(endofword != std::string::npos)
        length = endofword-startofword;

      std::string search = subject.substr(startofword, length);

      //try to find this word in the map
      if(replace_map.find(search) != replace_map.end())
      {
        //if found, replace the word with a new word
        subject.replace(startofword, length, replace_map[search]);
        startofword += replace_map[search].length();
      }
      else
      {
        startofword += length;
      }

    }

}
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I use the following functions, hope it helps:

//=============================================================================
//replaces each occurence of the phrase in sWhat with sReplacement
std::string& sReplaceAll(std::string& sS, const std::string& sWhat, const std::string& sReplacement)
{
    size_t pos = 0, fpos;
    while ((fpos = sS.find(sWhat, pos)) != std::string::npos)
    {
        sS.replace(fpos, sWhat.size(), sReplacement);
        pos = fpos + sReplacement.length();
    }
    return sS;
}

//=============================================================================
// replaces each single char from sCharList that is found within sS with entire sReplacement
std::string& sReplaceChars(std::string& sS, const std::string& sCharList, const std::string& sReplacement)
{
    size_t pos=0;
    while (pos < sS.length())
    {
        if (sCharList.find(sS.at(pos),0)!=std::string::npos) //pos is where a charlist-char was found
        {
            sS.replace(pos, 1, sReplacement);
            pos += sReplacement.length()-1;
        }
        pos++;  
    }
    return sS;
}
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