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I currently have multiple classes that all depend on one class, the Database class. Each class requires an instance of the Database class to function, and with that, I am a little concerned.

Before I convert all my procedural code to object-oriented code I need to figure this out. I Currently have one database connection for the entire program. However, from what I understand when I convert my code to OOP I will have multiple classes all with open database connections within the same program. (all of these classes will be included in the main program file).

How do I implement this correctly? I'm assuming having 5 open database connections within the same program is certainly not the correct way.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Gordon Mar 30 '13 at 12:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
you might find this topic relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/11369360/… –  tereško Mar 30 '13 at 12:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could share a database connection between several different objects by supplying it as an argument to the constructor, or you could create a singleton to serve the other classes with the database connection.

Passing the database connection to constructor

class Foo {

    private $database = null;

    public function __construct(&$database) {
        $this->database = $database;
    }
}
$connection = mysql_connect(..);
$bar = new Foo($connection);

Singleton

class DatabaseConnection {

    private static $instance = null;

    private function __construct() {
    }

    public static function &getInstance() {
        if (DatabaseConnection::$instance == null) {
            DatabaseConnection::$instance = new DatabaseConnection();
        }
        return DatabaseConnection::$instance;
    }
}

$mysql_query("...", DatabaseConnection::getInstance());

The & means passing by reference, so there would be only one instance of the database object even if it is used in several different files, classes or functions. See http://php.net/manual/en/language.references.pass.php for more information.

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This definitely answers my question. The latter is what I expected to do. However, it seems so unclean. Having to resort to a static variable to hold the instance of the class. Oh well. Thank you! –  Steffan Long Mar 30 '13 at 6:23
    
The Singleton design pattern is well known, although disliked by many since it is, as you say, so unclean. –  Jakob Pogulis Mar 30 '13 at 6:24
    
@SteffanLong in case you copied the code, there was a stray exclamation mark in the getInstance() method, although it is fixed now. –  Jakob Pogulis Mar 30 '13 at 6:26
1  
@JakobPogulis The first option (passing it to the constructor) is much better since it will let you easily mock, and test your program by passing a 'fake' data-base connection that will let you isolate problems later. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 30 '13 at 12:27
1  
-1: singleton is an antipattern, that introduces global state in an application. Also, since PHP5.0, passing objects by reference is harmful. –  tereško Mar 30 '13 at 12:32

If you have classes that depend on database abstraction then Dependency Injection is the way to go.

class PDOProvider extends PDO
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        try { 

          parent::__construct(...); 
          $this->setAttribute(....);

        } catch(PDOException $e){
            die($e->getMessage());
        }
    }
    // ...
}

class Users
{
    private $provider; 

    public function __construct(PDOProvider $provider) // <- Injecting class dependency
    {
       $this->provider = $provider;
    }

    public function insert(array $stuff)
    {
       try {

        $this->provider->prepare("INSERT ...");
        $this->provider->execute(array(..));

       } catch(PDOException $e){
          //...
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, using dependency-injection as you've demonstrated is great. However it is not so great to let the model know about the database... It should be considered a service layer and be decoupled from the model. What if you want to change your model-service layer to something else? Then you're in trouble! –  Centril Mar 30 '13 at 12:35
    
Here's some thoughts for consideration: stackoverflow.com/questions/5863870/… –  Centril Mar 30 '13 at 12:54

Jakobs advice on using Singleton + aggregation is sound advice. To that I'd add Doctrine ORM/DBAL, http://docs.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine-orm/en/latest/tutorials/getting-started.html

Avoid coupling the singleton instance directly to your objects by using them inside the "Foo" class, but rather pass the singleton instance to the constructor. This way you have more decoupling and thus more freedom.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your advice. –  Steffan Long Mar 30 '13 at 6:32
    
You're welcome. metal_fan:s answer is also great, Dependency Injection is what you should be using, but you'll probably need to store application dependencies in a sort of registry for your app - I'd store the EntityManager or DB-handle there and then implement some sort of Application -> getInstance() -> getDependency( "DB" ). Alternatively, if you decide to use MVC, you could always pass DB-handle to your controller "behind the sceen". Btw, if you've the privilige of using PHP5.3, use Late static binding: stackoverflow.com/questions/5152085/… –  Centril Mar 30 '13 at 6:44
    
It may very well be so, but just stating "singleton is NEVER good advice" is neither. If you're making such a claim, at least back it up. My view on singleton is that it should be avoided - that it is a necessary evil sometimes. My view of it is pragmatic. Besides, in my advice I also brought up decoupling & Doctrine... –  Centril Mar 30 '13 at 13:05
    
I upvoted your post. I don't know why it was downvoted. –  Steffan Long Apr 3 '13 at 23:18

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