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I want to left shift an n*n array (n is an even number ), m times like this Image :

enter image description here

I spent one day to find a solution, but I couldn't find a general solution.

Do you know an algorithm to solve this problem? Or any guide that can help me ?

for example(each parenthesis represents a cell in array ) :

n= 2 and m =1  
before shifting :  
(1)    (2)  
(3)    (4)  

after shifting :  
(2)    (4)  
(0)    (3)  

Second example :

n= 4 and m =2  
before shifting :  
(1)    (2)   (3)    (4)  
(5)    (6)   (7)    (8)  
(9)    (10)  (11)   (12)  
(13)   (14)  (15)   (16)  

after shifting :  
(3)   (4)   (8)    (12)  
(7)   (11)  (10)   (16)  
(6)   (0)   (0)    (15)  
(5)   (9)   (13)   (14)  
share|improve this question
1  
The image doesn't represent n*n array at all to me. Sorry –  gerrytan Mar 30 '13 at 8:03
    
Maybe you find your solution in matrix calculus. –  L.Butz Mar 30 '13 at 8:04
    
Please show us the code you have so far. –  NPE Mar 30 '13 at 8:07
    
@NPE OP need an idea/guide...yet he couldn't write code. –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 30 '13 at 8:08
1  
what is happening to the first element? what value is the last element afer shifting (the inserted one)? –  Peter Miehle Mar 30 '13 at 8:18
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The idea is simple. You shift the outer envelope/shell, then shift the next inner and so on, until there's nothing else to shift.

Between consecutive shifts you copy the first character of the next inner envelope/shell to the last (just vacated) of the last envelope/shell. This gives you continuity, provides data flow between the envelopes/shells.

To shift a rectangular envelope by 1 position you may first count how many elements are in it (1 in 1x1, 4 in 2x2, 8 in 3x3, 12 in 4x4 and so on for squares).

And then you can run a coordinate/position along the envelope from 0 to length-2, convert it into regular coordinates within the 2d array. This will give you the position where to copy. Now, the position for the source is the very next one along the envelope and you can convert it into 2d coordinates similarly.

My implementation in C:

#include <stdio.h>

/*
  (2w+2h-4)/0  1     ..    w-2  w-1
              +---------------+ 
      2w+2h-5 |               | w
            . |               | .
            . |               | .
            . |               | .
       2w+h-2 |               | w+h-3
              +---------------+
       2w+h-3  2w+h-4 .. w+h-1  w+h-2
*/

int EnvelopeLength(int w, int h)
{
  if (w <= 0 || h <= 0)
    return 0;

  if (h == 1)
    return w;

  if (w == 1)
    return h;

  return 2 * (w + h) - 4;
}

#if 0 // this function is currently unused
int Coords2EnvelopePosition(int x, int y, int w, int h)
{
  int pos = -1;
  if (w <= 0 || h <= 0)
    pos = -1;
  else if (w == 1 && h == 1)
    pos = 0;
  else if (h == 1)
    pos = x;
  else if (w == 1)
    pos = y;
  else if (y == 0)
    pos = x;
  else if (x == w - 1)
    pos = w + y - 1;
  else if (y == h - 1)
    pos = 2 * w + h - x - 3;
  else if (x == 0)
    pos = 2 * w + 2 * h - y - 4;
  return pos;
}
#endif

void EnvelopePosition2Coords(int* px, int* py, int w, int h, int pos)
{
  *py = *px = -1;
  if (w <= 0 || h <= 0)
    *py = *px = -1;
  else if (w == 1 && h == 1)
    *py = *px = 0;
  else if (h == 1)
    *px = pos, *py = 0;
  else if (w == 1)
    *px = 0, *py = pos;
  else if (pos < w)
    *px = pos, *py = 0;
  else if (pos <= w + h - 2)
    *px = w - 1, *py = pos - w + 1;
  else if (pos <= 2 * w + h - 3)
    *px = 2 * w + h - 3 - pos, *py = h - 1;
  else if (pos <= 2 * w + 2 * h - 5)
    *px = 0, *py = 2 * w + 2 * h - 4 - pos;
}

void SpiralShift(char* a, int w, int h)
{
  int w0 = w;

  while (w > 0 && h > 0)
  {
    int len = EnvelopeLength(w, h), pos;
    int xto, yto, xfrom, yfrom;

    for (pos = 0; pos < len - 1; pos++)
    {
      EnvelopePosition2Coords(&xto, &yto, w, h, pos);
      EnvelopePosition2Coords(&xfrom, &yfrom, w, h, pos + 1);
      a[yto * w0 + xto] = a[yfrom * w0 + xfrom];
    }

    EnvelopePosition2Coords(&xto, &yto, w, h, len - 1);

    if (w > 2 && h > 2)
    {
      EnvelopePosition2Coords(&xfrom, &yfrom, w - 2, h - 2, 0);
      a[yto * w0 + xto] = a[w0 + 1 + yfrom * w0 + xfrom];
      w -= 2;
      h -= 2;
      a += w0 + 1;
    }
    else
    {
      a[yto * w0 + xto] = ' ';
      break;
    }
  }
}

void PrintSpiral(const char*s, int w, int h)
{
  int x, y;
  puts("Spiral:");
  for (y = 0; y < h; y++)
  {
    for (x = 0; x < w; x++)
      printf("%c ", s[y * w + x]);
    puts("");
  }
  puts("");
}

int main(void)
{
  char spiral1x1[1 * 1] =
    "a";
  char spiral2x2[2 * 2] =
    "wo"
    "dr";
  char spiral5x6[5 * 6] =
    "This i"
    "ing ss"
    "lce.e "
    "lnetna"
    "arips ";
  int i;

  PrintSpiral(spiral1x1, 1, 1);
  for (i = 0; i < 1 * 1; i++)
  {
    SpiralShift(spiral1x1, 1, 1);
    PrintSpiral(spiral1x1, 1, 1);
  }

  PrintSpiral(spiral2x2, 2, 2);
  for (i = 0; i < 2 * 2; i++)
  {
    SpiralShift(spiral2x2, 2, 2);
    PrintSpiral(spiral2x2, 2, 2);
  }

  PrintSpiral(spiral5x6, 6, 5);
  for (i = 0; i < 5 * 6; i++)
  {
    SpiralShift(spiral5x6, 6, 5);
    PrintSpiral(spiral5x6, 6, 5);
  }
  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

Spiral:
a 

Spiral:


Spiral:
w o 
d r 

Spiral:
o r 
  d 

Spiral:
r d 


Spiral:
d   


Spiral:



Spiral:
T h i s   i 
i n g   s s 
l c e . e   
l n e t n a 
a r i p s   

Spiral:
h i s   i s 
n g   s e   
i e .   n a 
l c n e t   
l a r i p s 

Spiral:
i s   i s   
g   s e n a 
n .     t   
i e c n e s 
l l a r i p 

Spiral:
s   i s   a 
  s e n t   
g       e s 
n . e c n p 
i l l a r i 

Spiral:
  i s   a   
s e n t e s 
        n p 
g   . e c i 
n i l l a r 

Spiral:
i s   a   s 
e n t e n p 
s       c i 
      . e r 
g n i l l a 

Spiral:
s   a   s p 
n t e n c i 
e       e r 
s       . a 
  g n i l l 

Spiral:
  a   s p i 
t e n c e r 
n       . a 
e         l 
s   g n i l 

Spiral:
a   s p i r 
e n c e . a 
t         l 
n         l 
e s   g n i 

Spiral:
  s p i r a 
n c e .   l 
e         l 
t         i 
n e s   g n 

Spiral:
s p i r a l 
c e .     l 
n         i 
e         n 
t n e s   g 

Spiral:
p i r a l l 
e .       i 
c         n 
n         g 
e t n e s   

Spiral:
i r a l l i 
.         n 
e         g 
c           
n e t n e s 

Spiral:
r a l l i n 
          g 
.           
e         s 
c n e t n e 

Spiral:
a l l i n g 

          s 
.         e 
e c n e t n 

Spiral:
l l i n g   
          s 
          e 
          n 
. e c n e t 

Spiral:
l i n g   s 
          e 
          n 
          t 
  . e c n e 

Spiral:
i n g   s e 
          n 
          t 
          e 
    . e c n 

Spiral:
n g   s e n 
          t 
          e 
          n 
      . e c 

Spiral:
g   s e n t 
          e 
          n 
          c 
        . e 

Spiral:
  s e n t e 
          n 
          c 
          e 
          . 

Spiral:
s e n t e n 
          c 
          e 
          . 


Spiral:
e n t e n c 
          e 
          . 



Spiral:
n t e n c e 
          . 




Spiral:
t e n c e . 





Spiral:
e n c e .   





Spiral:
n c e .     





Spiral:
c e .       





Spiral:
e .         





Spiral:
.           





Spiral:
share|improve this answer
    
Alexey Frunze nice!! –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 30 '13 at 10:46
1  
@GrijeshChauhan Thanks! –  Alexey Frunze Mar 30 '13 at 10:51
    
@AlexeyFrunze what is the use of "Coords2EnvelopePosition" function ? –  Reza Oruji Apr 4 '13 at 9:11
1  
It's the opposite of the similarly named function. What was the compiler that didn't like char spiral1x1[1 * 1] = "a";? –  Alexey Frunze Apr 4 '13 at 20:02
1  
C++ differs from C here. C++ requires an extra char in the array if you initialize it with a string literal. C doesn't. Compile the code as C or adjust it appropriately for C++. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 6 '13 at 21:23
show 2 more comments

Here is a hint.

There is an interesting recursive solution that you can get. Think of your matrix as a bunch of matrices nested inside one another (e.g. for an nxn matrix, there is also an (n-2)x(n-2) matrix inside it, etc. An example is the matrix

 1  2  3  4
 5  6  7  8
 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16

has a submatrix

 6  7
10 11

The elements on the outer ring of the larger matrix are the first part of the spiral. Once you have taken care of shifting these, you don't need to worry about them. You can just consider the next ring of the matrix as though it is a new matrix. The inner matrix is a subproblem of the original matrix.

So you need to find a solution that you can apply to the outer elements of the original matrix, then apply the same type of solution to the inner matrix, and so on until you reach the center. If you think about it, this is the reason that n is an even number. Each sub-matrix has a size of n-2, or (n-2)-2, etc. until you reach a submatrix that is 2x2.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer +1. –  JeremyP Mar 30 '13 at 10:01
    
Good Hint, Thank you –  Reza Oruji Mar 30 '13 at 11:47
add comment

Basically, you're trying to move numbers along a spiral from the middle to the outside edge. A spiral is a line wound up, so it seems to me the solution is to store your array as a one dimensional array with the zeroth element representing the middle of spiral and the Nth element (where N = n x n) as the last element on the outside of the spiral (or you can start from the outside and work inwards).

Your problem then becomes trivial to solve, but you have a new issue which is: given a coordinate pair, which element in the array do I need to access? I've thought about this for a good long time (i.e. at least 10 minutes) and the best answer I can think of is to create a two dimensional lookup array. In the 4 x 4 case, it would look like this:

15 14 13 12
 4  3  2 11
 5  0  1 10
 6  7  8  9

Or like this:

 0  1  2  3
11 12 13  4
10 15 14  5
 9  8  7  6

If you start from the outside and work in, you can generate the lookup array programmatically quite easily (pseudocode):

fill the lookup array with -1s
Set location to (0, 0)
Set direction to east
Set counter to 0 

while (counter < array size)
    set location to counter
    increment counter
    if next location in current direction is off the edge or is not -1
        turn right (east => south, south => west, west => north, north => east)
    move one square in current direction
share|improve this answer
1  
I was in my 11th minute of thinking this over and came to the same solution, so i deleted my answer. –  Peter Miehle Mar 30 '13 at 9:54
    
Thank you for pseudo code –  Reza Oruji Mar 30 '13 at 11:47
add comment
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define N 4

void initialize(int *pa){
    int i;
    for(i=1;i<= N * N;++i)
        *pa++ = i;
}

void print(int a[N][N]){
    int i,j;
    for(i=0;i<N;++i){
        for(j=0;j<N;++j)
            printf("(%2d)", a[i][j]);
        printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");
}

void spiralShiftLeft(int a[N][N], int n){
    int **pa;
    int i,x,y,c,size=N*N,step;

    pa = (int**)calloc(size, sizeof(int*));
    x=y=0;//x,y is location
    //c is counter
    //step is control
    step = N;
    c=0;
    while(c<size){
        int s;
        --step;
        for(s=0;s<step;++s)
            pa[c++] = &a[y][x++];//up part
        for(s=0;s<step;++s)
            pa[c++] = &a[y++][x];//right part
        for(s=0;s<step;++s)
            pa[c++] = &a[y][x--];//bottom part
        for(s=0;s<step;++s)
            pa[c++] = &a[y--][x];//left part
        ++x;++y;//next step start position
        --step;
    }
    //shift
    for(i=0;i<size;++i){
        int p=i+n;
        *pa[i] = (p<size) ? *pa[p] : 0;
    }
    free(pa);
}
//demo
int main (void){
    int org[N][N];

    initialize((int*)org);
    print(org);
    spiralShiftLeft(org, 2);
    print(org);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank You, it works, but no explanation about the algorithm –  Reza Oruji Mar 30 '13 at 11:39
1  
@RezaOruji (1) make pointer array as spiral sequence. (2) array slide by pointer. –  BLUEPIXY Mar 30 '13 at 12:40
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