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I'm not sure if the title makes any sense, but here is what I need.

This is my byte: ���������ˇ�����0F*E��ù� � I have already managed to get the values of this byte with this php snippet:

<?php
$var = "���������ˇ�����0F*E��ù�";

for($i = 0; $i < strlen($var); $i++)
{
   echo ord($var[$i])."<br/>";
}
?>

The result was: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 255 0 0 0 0 0 2 48 70 1 42 69 0 0 1 157 0

But now I need to do the exact same thing without php, but in Java Script. Any help would be appreciated

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2  
I don't think you're using the correct terminology: for one, JavaScript has no concept of a "byte", secondly a byte in most computers is an 8-bit value, what you've got looks like a string of text. –  Dai Mar 30 '13 at 10:44
    
What do you have in javascript? In javascript strings are not byte arrays like they are in PHP. In javascript string is distinct from Uint8Array/Buffer. –  Esailija Mar 30 '13 at 10:45

2 Answers 2

If you're wanting to get the numeric value of each character in a string in JavaScript, that can be done like so:

var someString = "blarg";

for(var i=0;i<someString.length;i++) {
    var char = someString.charCodeAt(i);

}

String.charCodeAt(index) returns the Unicode code-point value of the specified character in the string. It does not behave like PHP or C where it returns the numeric value of a fixed 8-bit encoding (i.e. ASCII). Assuming your string is a human-readable string (as opposed to raw binary data) then using charCodeAt is perfectly fine. If you're working with raw binary data then don't use a JavaScript string.

If your strings contain characters that have Unicode code-points below 128 then charCodeAt behaves the same as ord in PHP or C's char type, however the example you've provided contains non-ASCII characters, so Unicode's (sometimes complicated) rules will come into play.

See the documentation on charCodeAt here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/charCodeAt

share|improve this answer
    
PHP "strings" represent arbitrary binary data, not just ASCII or even characters at all. –  Esailija Mar 30 '13 at 10:50
    
@Esailija That is what I meant :) –  Dai Mar 30 '13 at 10:51
    
@Dai Thanks. I tried your solution, and got this: 65533 Here is the URL with your code: ayroa.com/goproapp/test.html I don't know what's the problem, but I need this to be my output: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 255 0 0 0 0 0 2 48 70 1 42 69 0 0 1 157 0 –  Realatory Mar 30 '13 at 10:56

The PHP String is computed as 8-bit (bytes 0..255) while JavaScript uses 16-bit unicode characters (0..65535). Depending on your string you may either split it into (16bit) char codes or into the bytes. If you know your String contains only 8-bit chars you may ignore the "hiByte" (see below) to get the same results as in PHP.

function toByteVersionA(s) {
    var len = s.length;
    // char codes
    var charCodes = new Array();
    for(var i=0; i<len; i++) {
        charCodes.push(s.charCodeAt(i).toString());
    }
    var charCodesString = charCodes.join(" ");
    return charCodesString;
}

function toByteVersionB(s) {
    var len = s.length;
    var bytes = new Array();
    for(var i=0; i<len; i++) {
        var charCode = s.charCodeAt(i);
        var loByte = charCode & 255;
        var hiByte = charCode >> 8;
        bytes.push(loByte.toString());
        bytes.push(hiByte.toString());
    }
   var bytesString = bytes.join(" ");
   return bytesString;
}

function toByteVersionC(s) {
   var len = s.length;
   var bytes = new Array();
   for(var i=0; i<len; i++) {
        var charCode = s.charCodeAt(i);
        var loByte = charCode & 255;
        bytes.push(loByte.toString());
   }
   var bytesString = bytes.join(" ");
   return bytesString;
}

var myString = "abc"; // whatever your String is
var myBytes = toByteVersionA(myString); // whatever version you want
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I really don't have any knowledge about Java Script. Where do I have to enter the string "ˇ0F*Eù" in your Code? And how can I get the output of the final number like in the php script? –  Realatory Mar 30 '13 at 12:17
    
I have modified the code so you can enter your String (variable myString) and get the converted bytes (variable myBytes). –  Michael Besteck Mar 31 '13 at 9:17

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