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If I know that I only will create one instance of the MyClass function below, which of my two snippets below would you prefer? Should I stick with the latter, even though I know that I'll only create one instance of the function?

I know that prototype is useful from a performance perspective when sharing methods across all instances of a function, but in this case I would like to hear your input.

var MyClass = (function () {

    var cls = function () { };

    cls.prototype = {

        init: function(data){

        }
    };

    return cls;
})();

vs

var MyClass = (function () {

    var cls = function () { 

        this.init = function(data){

        }
    };

    return cls;
})();
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your second code snippet is a syntax error, you're trying to put a property initializer where a statement is expected. (Not anymore)

If you're only going to have a single object that you need the init function on, then:

var MyObject = {
    init: function(data) {
        // ...
    }
};

Then you don't even need to call a function to create it, it's already there.

If you want to have truly private variables and such (which I assume is the reason for your outer anonymous functions), then:

var MyObject = (function() {
    var trulyPrivateDataHere;

    return {
        init: function(data) {
            // ...
        }
    };
})();

I prefer this because it's clear and direct: You're creating the actual object. I don't see any need for a constructor function if you're only ever going to create a single instance.

But if it has to be a constructor function, I guess I'd very marginally prefer your second option, because it's simpler, and simple is good barring the need for complexity.

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Sorry, wrote it on top of my head without testing it. I updated the code with the correct syntax. You are correct about why I'm using the closures and I know about the private methods/variables. But with the code updated, which of the two examples would you prefer, and why? –  Johan Mar 30 '13 at 12:17
    
@Johan: Neither. I don't see any need to use a constructor function if you're only ever going to create one instance. :-) But if it has to be a constructor function, I guess I'd go with the second one, because it's simpler, and simple is good barring the need for complexity. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 30 '13 at 12:26
    
Hehe ok. But in the end, my last example and your code is pretty similar right? It's just a matter of if you create a variable and attach the "public" methods in advance and return it VS returning a new object with the methods that I want to expose? Btw, I'm getting an error in your code: jsfiddle.net/s3Get –  Johan Mar 30 '13 at 12:41
    
@Johan: The difference is whether you need to call it to get the object. The reason you're getting an error is you're trying to treat it like a constructor function. The whole point of my answer is: You don't need a constructor function at all, just use MyObject (that's why I called it that, not MyClass). Here's your fiddle updated to work (I changed MyObject to o to match your fiddle): jsfiddle.net/s3Get/2 –  T.J. Crowder Mar 30 '13 at 12:45
    
Got it. Thank you T.J. –  Johan Mar 30 '13 at 12:55

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