Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to convert longs to string, but I can't use sprintf().

Here's my code

char *ultostr(unsigned long value, char *ptr, int base)
{
    unsigned long t = 0; 
    unsigned long res = 0;
    unsigned long tmp;
    int count = 0;

    tmp = value;

    if (ptr == NULL)
    {
        return NULL;
    }

    if (tmp == 0)
    {
        count++;
    }

    while(tmp > 0)
    {
        tmp = tmp/base;
        count++;
    }

    ptr += count;
    *ptr = '\0';

    do
    {
        t = value / base;
        res = value - (base*t);

        if (res < 10)
        {
            * -- ptr = '0' + res;
        }
        else if ((res >= 10) && (res < 16))
        {
            * --ptr = 'A' - 10 + res;
        }

        value = t;
    } while (value != 0);

   return(ptr);
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Gian, dasblinkenlight, Kerrek SB, Alexey Frunze, Prof. Falken Apr 3 '13 at 5:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
what is wrong with your solution? –  Martinsos Mar 30 '13 at 12:51
1  
I can certainly write something smaller than that (because I've written this sort of code many times - practice, practice and more practice, and you may achieve something less imperfect [calling what I do "perfect" is probably not right]), but I don't see a question, so not sure what you want to have answered? –  Mats Petersson Mar 30 '13 at 12:52
    
The code you've got is not bad. What is your question? –  dasblinkenlight Mar 30 '13 at 12:55
1  
It depends why you can't use sprintf. If it's because you're on a non-standard C++ implementation where it's missing, then the answer might be different from if it's because you're implementing (one small part of) sprintf as an exercise. –  Steve Jessop Mar 30 '13 at 13:01
    
@SteveJessop 90% it's the latter :) –  icepack Mar 30 '13 at 13:05

4 Answers 4

You can use stringstream.

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ostringstream ss;
    long i = 10;
    ss << i;
    string str = ss.str();
    cout << str << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

You could use stringstream I think.

#include <sstream>
...
std::stringstream x;
x << 1123;
cout << x.str().c_str();

(x.str().c_str() makes it char*) it worked for me.

share|improve this answer

You should take advantage of stream objects like std::stringstream:

#include <string>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    long int i = 10000;

    std::stringstream ss;
    std::string str;

    ss << i;

    str = ss.str();

    std::cout << str; // 10000
}

Live Demo

share|improve this answer
    
You don't really need the str variable, you can std::cout << ss.str(); –  Steve Jessop Mar 30 '13 at 12:55
    
@SteveJessop Thanks :) –  0x499602D2 Mar 30 '13 at 12:56
    
to_string uses sprintf internally. If the OP's requirement is deep, then to_string would be equally prohibited. –  Kerrek SB Mar 30 '13 at 13:08
 #include<iostream>
 #include<string>
 #include<sstream>

 int main(int argc, char *argv[])
  {
    unsigned long d = 1234567;
    std::stringstream m_ss;
    m_ss << d;
    std::string my_str;
    m_ss >> my_str;
    std::cout<<my_str<<std::endl;

    return 0;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
OMG, yesterdays' 3 answers with stringstream probably not enough –  icepack Mar 31 '13 at 14:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.