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This test runs but fails. Not sure why? There is a class Submarine with length 1.

@Test   
public void testShipConstructor() {
    assertTrue(Submarine.length == 1);      
}

Here is the code for the class:

public abstract class Ship {

    private int size;
    public static int length;

    protected Ship(int size, String type, String shortForm) {
        this.size = size;
        this.setType(type);
        this.shortForm = shortForm;
    }

    public static void setLength(int length) {
    }

    public int getLength() {
        return length;
    }

    int getSize() {
        return size;
    }
}

public class Submarine extends Ship {

    private final static int SIZE = 1;

    /**
     * * Constructor, sets inherited length variable.
     */
    public Submarine() {
        super(SIZE, "Submarine", "#");
    }
}
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2  
What's Submarine? Could you show this class? –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 30 '13 at 12:56
2  
Test the object's behavior, not whether it is constructed or its values. –  luckykevin Mar 30 '13 at 12:57
    
public abstract class Ship { private int size; public static int length; protected Ship(int size, String type, String shortForm) { this.size = size; this.setType(type); this.shortForm = shortForm; } public static void setLength(int length) { } public int getLength() { return length; } int getSize() { return size; } } --------- public class Submarine extends Ship { private final static int SIZE = 1; /** * Constructor, sets inherited length variable. */ public Submarine() { super(SIZE, "Submarine", "#"); } } –  user742730 Mar 30 '13 at 13:10
    
@user742730 It is more readable to include the code in your question directly (there is an edit link below your question). I have done it for you. –  assylias Mar 30 '13 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Did you instantiate your Ship class somewhere? I'm assuming the constructor takes a value n to represent the length?

assuming public class Submarine extends Ship

and a constructor of either Submarine(int size){} or Ship(int ship){}

your test should include:

int desiredSize = 1;
Submarine mySub = new Submarine(desiredSize);
assertEquals(mySub.getSize(), desiredSize);
share|improve this answer
    
I instantiated new Submarine in an array fleet. Test now incorrectly passes with 0 in assertEquals(submarine.getLenth(),0) @Test public void testShipConstructor2() { Ship[] fleet = new Ship[10]; int length = 1; fleet[3] = new Submarine(); assertEquals(Submarine.getLength(), 0); } –  user742730 Mar 30 '13 at 13:24
1  
Because the test is looking at an int field named Length, but your constructor is setting the field named Size. I have updated my code sample based on the code you have added... –  Mike Mar 30 '13 at 13:32
    
You're welcome. Please show your thanks to the community by accepting the answer that solved your problem. –  Mike Mar 30 '13 at 13:40

Is Submarine the class-name? In that case I think length is static, because you access it in a static way. So you should initialize length outside the constructor. Furthermore then your test does not test the constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It now seems to work with size instead of length. @Test public void testShipConstructor2() { Ship[] fleet = new Ship[10]; int size = 1; fleet[3] = new Submarine(); assertEquals(Submarine.getSize(), 1); } –  user742730 Mar 30 '13 at 13:34
    
Hold on, making values static made the test work, but stopped the program working. So have reverted back to not static values but now the test is not working. Is there another simple way to test the constructor? –  user742730 Mar 30 '13 at 14:56
    
I don’t understand your test. In your code above you never initialize length, so why should length be one? –  user2226834 Mar 30 '13 at 17:24

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