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I'm trying to split the string:

"[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"

into the following array:

[
  ["test","blah"]
  ["foo","bar bar bar"]
  ["test","abc","123","456 789"]
]

I tried the following, but it isn't quite right:

"[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"
.scan(/\[(.*?)\s*\|\s*(.*?)\]/)
# =>
# [
#   ["test", "blah"]
#   ["foo", "bar bar bar"]
#   ["test", "abc |123 | 456 789"]
# ]

I need to split at every pipe instead of the first pipe. What would be the correct regular expression to achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Ruby .split() Regular Expression –  sawa Mar 30 '13 at 14:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
 s = "[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"
 arr = s.scan(/\[(.*?)\]/).map {|m| m[0].split(/ *\| */)}
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1  
This is the best answer. It uses scan and split in the write place. –  sawa Mar 30 '13 at 14:13
    
All the answers are great but this looks like the simplest solution. –  Ryan King Mar 30 '13 at 22:26

Two alternatives:

s = "[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"

s.split(/\s*\n\s*/).map{ |p| p.scan(/[^|\[\]]+/).map(&:strip) }
#=> [["test", "blah"], ["foo", "bar bar bar"], ["test", "abc", "123", "456 789"]]

irb> s.split(/\s*\n\s*/).map do |line|
  line.sub(/^\s*\[\s*/,'').sub(/\s*\]\s*$/,'').split(/\s*\|\s*/)
end
#=> [["test", "blah"], ["foo", "bar bar bar"], ["test", "abc", "123", "456 789"]]

Both of them start by splitting on newlines (throwing away surrounding whitespace).

The first one then splits each chunk by looking for anything that is not a [, |, or ] and then throws away extra whitespace (calling strip on each).

The second one then throws away leading [ and trailing ] (with whitespace) and then splits on | (with whitespace).


You cannot get the final result you want with a single scan. About the closest you can get is this:

s.scan /\[(?:([^|\]]+)\|)*([^|\]]+)\]/
#=> [["test", " blah"], ["foo ", "bar bar bar"], ["123 ", " 456 789"]]

…which drops information, or this:

s.scan /\[((?:[^|\]]+\|)*[^|\]]+)\]/
#=> [["test| blah"], ["foo |bar bar bar"], ["test| abc |123 | 456 789"]]

…which captures the contents of each "array" as a single capture, or this:

s.scan /\[(?:([^|\]]+)\|)?(?:([^|\]]+)\|)?(?:([^|\]]+)\|)?([^|\]]+)\]/
#=> [["test", nil, nil, " blah"], ["foo ", nil, nil, "bar bar bar"], ["test", " abc ", "123 ", " 456 789"]]

…which is hardcoded to a maximum of four items, and inserts nil entries that you would need to .compact away.

There is no way to use Ruby's scan to take a regex like /(?:(aaa)b)+/ and get multiple captures for each time the repetition is matched.

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Why the hard path (single regex)? Why not a simple combo of splits? Here are the steps, to visualize the process.

str = "[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"

arr = str.split("\n").map(&:strip) # => ["[test| blah]", "[foo |bar bar bar]", "[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"]
arr = arr.map{|s| s[1..-2] } # => ["test| blah", "foo |bar bar bar", "test| abc |123 | 456 789"]
arr = arr.map{|s| s.split('|').map(&:strip)} # => [["test", "blah"], ["foo", "bar bar bar"], ["test", "abc", "123", "456 789"]]

This is likely far less efficient than scan, but at least it's simple :)

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A "Scan, Split, Strip, and Delete" Train-Wreck

The whole premise seems flawed, since it assumes that you will always find alternation in your sub-arrays and that expressions won't contain character classes. Still, if that's the problem you really want to solve for, then this should do it.

First, str.scan( /\[.*?\]/ ) will net you three array elements, each containing pseudo-arrays. Then you map the sub-arrays, splitting on the alternation character. Each element of the sub-array is then stripped of whitespace, and the square brackets deleted. For example:

str = "[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"
str.scan( /\[.*?\]/ ).map { |arr| arr.split('|').map { |m| m.strip.delete '[]' }}

#=> [["test", "blah"], ["foo", "bar bar bar"], ["test", "abc", "123", "456 789"]]

Verbosely, Step-by-Step

Mapping nested arrays is not always intuitive, so I've unwound the train-wreck above into more procedural code for comparison. The results are identical, but the following may be easier to reason about.

string = "[test| blah] \n [foo |bar bar bar]\n[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"
array_of_strings = string.scan( /\[.*?\]/ )
#=> ["[test| blah]", "[foo |bar bar bar]", "[test| abc |123 | 456 789]"]

sub_arrays = array_of_strings.map { |sub_array| sub_array.split('|') }
#=> [["[test", " blah]"],
#    ["[foo ", "bar bar bar]"],
#    ["[test", " abc ", "123 ", " 456 789]"]]

stripped_sub_arrays = sub_arrays.map { |sub_array| sub_array.map(&:strip) }
#=> [["[test", "blah]"],
#    ["[foo", "bar bar bar]"],
#    ["[test", "abc", "123", "456 789]"]]

sub_arrays_without_brackets =
  stripped_sub_arrays.map { |sub_array| sub_array.map {|elem| elem.delete '[]'} }
#=> [["test", "blah"], ["foo", "bar bar bar"], ["test", "abc", "123", "456 789"]]
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