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I have need of some logic in a stored procedure. All the stored procedure does it perform a couple of logic rules and then returns a true or false depending on the result.

The pseudo SQL code:

CREATE TABLE #PV ([Date] DATETIME, Dis FLOAT, Del Float, Sold Float)
INSERT #PV exec GetPVSummaryReport @ID, @PID, @From, @To
SELECT AVG(Dis) / 8 AS DisAvg, AVG(Del) AS DelAvg FROM #PV
IF DisAvg > 20 -- this is the bit I am having problems grokking
    RETURN TRUE
ELSE
    -- do longer calculation

How do you do this sort of logic?

Notes about the code: The table #PV has 4 fields - those provided (Date, Dis, Del and Sold).

share|improve this question
    
Does it have to be a stored procedure? This seems like it may be easier and more useful in application code. –  recursive Oct 15 '09 at 12:21
    
Since I need to hit the database twice to find a boolean value, it seemed better to use an SP so I don't perform excessive network chatter. Also it will be called about 20 times in quick succession. –  graham.reeds Oct 15 '09 at 12:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
declare @DisAvg float
declare @DelAvg float

-- Instantiate #PV etc

select
  @DisAvg = avg(Dis) / 8,
  @DelAvg = avg(Del)
from
  #PV

if @DisAvg > 20
  return
else
  -- Do something else
share|improve this answer
    
The RETURN statement should have a value to indicate the condition the procedure was in upon termination. –  NYSystemsAnalyst Oct 15 '09 at 12:32
    
The question applied to expressions, not return values. I deliberately chose not to return anything in particular. –  Luke Bennett Oct 15 '09 at 12:34
    
Fair enough. +1 for simplest solution that seems to be basically what graham is looking for. –  NYSystemsAnalyst Oct 15 '09 at 12:47
    
Since Luke was the first, and his code did demonstrate where I was going wrong, he get's the tick. –  graham.reeds Oct 15 '09 at 13:07

why is everyone creating a Temp Table? Variable tables are so much nicer (and more performant) :)

lets see...

DECLARE @PV TABLE ([Date] DATETIME,
    Dis FLOAT,
    Del FLOAT,
    Sold FLOAT)

INSERT INTO @PV
EXEC [dbo].[GetPVSummaryReport] @ID, @PID, @From, @To


-- Create some variables, which will contain the results.
DECLARE @DisAvg AS FLOAT,
    @DelAvg AS FLOAT

-- Retrieve results into a variables.
SELECT @DisAvg = AVG(Dis) / 8, @DelAvg AVG(Del)
FROM @PV

-- Check results...    
IF @DisAvg > 20 
   RETURN TRUE
ELSE BEGIN
    -- do longer calculation
END

-- NOTE: I'm not sure where you use @DelAvg .. 
--       I'm assuming it's in the 'do longer calculation' section.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Did you actually read the article you linked to? In certain conditions table variables perform far worse than temporary tables. –  Luke Bennett Oct 15 '09 at 12:36
    
According to this (databases.aspfaq.com/database/…) you can't use a table variable if you "INSERT @table EXEC sp_someProcedure" which is exactly what I am doing. –  graham.reeds Oct 15 '09 at 12:39
    
The @DelAvg was supposed to be in the OR section of the logic. I removed it when trying to determine how to work with SQL. –  graham.reeds Oct 15 '09 at 12:40
    
@Luke : Yep, I have ages back. In certain conditions? please. In certain conditions, i'll fall out of bed and an asteroid will hit the earth. There's always a certain condition. What about the common/general condition? I'm under the impression that, generally, it (variable tables) perform better that the old school temp tables. –  Pure.Krome Oct 16 '09 at 1:01
    
@Graham.Reeds: Sure about that Graham? i'm doing INSERT INTO @table all the time. (/me runs off, tests this out .. runs back). Confirmed. It does work. Please try it yourself. takes one sec. –  Pure.Krome Oct 16 '09 at 1:02

LABELS are a beautiful things. LABELS allow you to use GOTO's and this lets you write simple to follow logic inside your stored procedures.


DECLARE @Result int
SET @Result = 1 -- 1=True 0=False

IF TEST1 Failed
BEGIN
  SET @Result = 0
  GOTO ENDPROCESSING
END

IF TEST2 Failed
BEGIN
  SET @Result = 0
  GOTO ENDPROCESSING
END
IF TEST3 Failed
BEGIN
  SET @Result = 0
  GOTO ENDPROCESSING
END

ENDPROCESSING:
SELECT @Result
share|improve this answer
    
Neat. Never knew SP had goto. –  graham.reeds Oct 26 '09 at 9:09

You need to declare a variable and select into it

DECLARE @DisAvg DOUBLE, @DelAvg DOUBLE
SELECT @DisAvg = AVG(Dis) / 8, @DelAvg = AVG(Del) #PV
IF @DisAvg > 20 -- this is the bit I am having problems grokking
	RETURN 1
ELSE
	-- do longer calculation

Declare with the correct type of the Dis field.

Edit - corrected the return value.

share|improve this answer
    
return can return only integers –  Binoj Antony Oct 15 '09 at 12:27
    
Dude. fail. RETURN can return FLOATS, BIT, etc... Sif only INTEGERS. tsk tsk! –  Pure.Krome Oct 15 '09 at 12:35
    
yeah, check this- doc.ddart.net/mssql/sql70/ra-rz_14.htm –  Binoj Antony Oct 15 '09 at 12:44
    
Yep, you're right. I corrected the code example. I just copied the pseudo-code and missed that. –  rslite Oct 15 '09 at 12:59
DECLARE @DisAvg DECIMAL
DECLARE @ReturnValue bit

// use SET or SELECT to assign values to @DisAvg

IF (@DisAvg > 20)
BEGIN 
    SET  @ReturnValue = 1
END
ELSE
BEGIN

    -- do longer calculation
SET @ReturnValue = 0
END 
SELECT @ReturnValue

Only integers can be returned from the RETURN statement, you can use SELECT instead

share|improve this answer
    
You are not populating @DisAvg with the average - you are taking the last Dis entry from #PV –  Luke Bennett Oct 15 '09 at 12:27

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