Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have found myself to need an invocation of super.super.method() in java, which is not possible.

I am just wondering if I am having a design flaw here in my design, or not?

The classes:

package solvers.command;

/**
 *
 * @author student
 */
public abstract class Command {
    private boolean executed;   //executed state

    /**
     * Constructs a new Command object.
     * 
     * @modifies    this.executed = false
     */
    public Command() {
        this.executed = false;
    }

    /**
     * Executes this command.
     * 
     * @modifies executed = true
     * @pre {@code !executed}
     * @throws IllegalStateException if {@code executed}
     */
    public void execute() {
        if (executed) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("solvers.command.Command.execute: already executed");
        }
        executed = true;
    }

    /**
     * Undoes this command.
     * 
     * @modifies executed = false
     * @pre {@code executed}
     * @throws IllegalStateException if {@code !executed}
     */
    public void undo() {
        if (!executed) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("solvers.command.Command.undo: not executed yet");
        }
        executed = false;
    }

    /**
     * Returns the executed state
     * 
     * @return executed state
     */
    public boolean getExecuted() {
        return executed;
    }
}

package solvers.command;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

/**
 *
 * @author student
 */
public class CompoundCommand extends Command {
    List<Command> commands; //list of commands

    /**
     * Creates a new CompoundCommand.
     * 
     * @modifies this.commands is initialised
     */
    public CompoundCommand() {
        super();
        this.commands = new ArrayList<>();
    }

    /**
     * Adds a command to the list of commands.
     * 
     * @param command   The new command
     * @pre {@code command != null}
     * @throws IllegalArgumentException if {@code command == null}
     */
    public void add(final Command command) {
        if (command == null) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("solvers.command.CompoundCommand.add: "
                    + "command == null");
        }
        commands.add(command);
    }

    /**
     * Removes a command from the list of commands.
     * 
     * @param command   The command to be removed
     * @pre {@code command != null && commands.contains(command}
     * @throws IllegalArgumentException if {@code command == null || !commands.contains(command)}
     */
    public void remove(final Command command) {
        if (command == null) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("solvers.command.CompoundCommand.remove: "
                    + "command == null");
        }
        if (!commands.contains(command)) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("solvers.command.CompoundCommand.remove:"
                    + "command is not found in commands");
        }
        commands.remove(command);
    }

    /**
     * Returns if the list of commands is empty.
     * 
     * @return {@code commands.isEmpty()}
     */
    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return commands.isEmpty();
    }

    @Override
    public void execute() {
        super.execute();
        for (Command c : commands) {
            c.execute();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void undo() {
        super.undo();
        Collections.reverse(commands);
        for (Command c : commands) {
            c.undo();
        }
        Collections.reverse(commands);
    }
}

package solvers.command;

/**
 *
 * @author student
 */
public class ExecutedCompoundCommand extends CompoundCommand {

    /**
     * Creates a new ExecutedCompoundCommand.
     */
    public ExecutedCompoundCommand() {
        super();
    }

    @Override
    public void add(final Command command) {
        if (!command.getExecuted()) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("solvers.command.ExecutedCompoundCommand.add: "
                    + "command has not been executed yet.");
        }
        super.add(command);
    }

    @Override
    public void execute() {
        super.super.execute(); /* Does not work obviously */
        for (Command c : commands) {
            if (!c.getExecuted()) {
                c.execute();
            }
        }
    }
}

Basically I do want the safefty of the Command's execute(), while I do not want the implementation of CompoundCommand's execute() for ExecutedCompoundCommand, but I do want to just rely on the add(), remove() and undo() operations of CompoundCommand.

As a student, working on a project with required javadoc and unit testing, it is really needed that there is as few code duplication as possible, as it only makes more work.

share|improve this question
    
Nice title btw... –  Mysticial Mar 30 '13 at 15:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it is a design flaw. You can apply the Template Method Pattern [GOF 325]

Intent: Define the skeleton of an algorithm in an operation, deffering some steps to subclasses. Template Method lets subclasses redefine certain steps of an algorithm without changing the algorithm's structure.

From Gang of Four Design Patterns

You want to be sure that certain steps are executed. So you would make a final template method execute() and delegate to the doExecute() method, which can add additional logic and needs to be implemented by the subclasses.

public final void execute() {
  importantOperation();
  runsAlways();
  doExecute();
}

public abstract void doExecute(); // Override in subclasses
share|improve this answer
1  
I think this answer might be the most appropiate one for this case. I've had it in class, but it hasn't come to mind. But this is exactly what I want to do as I want to change the behaviour of the part inside the for-loop. This seems justifyable, whereas simply copying the execute() code from the Command class into ExecutedCompoundCommand's execute() is not really justifyable. –  skiwi Mar 30 '13 at 16:17

There are several ways of fixing this, and the best way depends on your intent. Here are a couple of suggestions:

Create a new class, CommandList, that supports the add(), remove(), and undo() operations.

CompoundCommand extends Command and has a CommandList.

ExecutedCompoundCommand extends Command and has a CommandList.

Another option is to create a new subclass of Command that supports the common operations and inherits Command's execute() method.

CompoundCommand would extend it and override just execute.

ExecutedCompoundCommand would also extend it, and so its super.execute() would be the Command execute().

share|improve this answer

Use the delegate pattern for common functionality instead of inheritance. Or the template pattern if you want to use inheritance.

share|improve this answer

Take a look here. Basically it explains why you should never need to do what you are looking to do.

As quoted from the link:

You shouldn't be able to bypass the parent class's behaviour. It makes sense to sometimes be able to bypass your own class's behaviour (particularly from within the same method) but not your parent's.

In the example shown in the link, the argument made is that the "middle" class, so to speak, is implementing some functionality or validity checks which will be bypassed by "skipping" a class in the hierarchy.

Read this small article for the benefits of encapsulation.

share|improve this answer
    
Please quote the relevant information so that your answer actually answers the question. Otherwise just post the link as a comment, and leave the answering to somebody else! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 30 '13 at 16:02
    
I have read this answer before, I understand it aswell, however I can not find a passage that is directly important (and would answer) my question. As I do not think that my example 100% follows what the author of that answer had in mind. –  skiwi Mar 30 '13 at 16:06
    
What you are trying to do is not in itself wrong in this case, it's just not allowed. So your best bet in my opinion is to implement add(), remove() and undo() as an interface –  Jurgen Camilleri Mar 30 '13 at 16:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.