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I have the following list of details

Latitude and Longitude,
Date/Time
Altitude and Azimuth

What I'm trying to do is calculate a relative latitude and longitude to the one used in my calculation so I can draw an oval with Google Maps V3 (JavaScript)

Is this possible or should I convert my lat/lng to page pixels and do it that way (but this isn't how I want to achieve the task)

[EDIT]

I'm trying to gather latitude and longitude coordinates based on the altitude and azimuth as viewed by a single observer, so one single point on my map I want to visualise the path of the sun throughout the day/time.

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1  
What is a "relative" latitude and longitude? –  Matt Ball Mar 30 '13 at 16:40
    
"Relative" to the observer. Something of an arc/circle around my current latitude and longitude. –  Dave Mackintosh Mar 30 '13 at 16:46
    
So you are trying to drop a circle on a map around each of the coordinates in your list? Or around your current location? –  Crescent Fresh Mar 30 '13 at 16:48
    
On a single set of coordinates (lat/long) on my map to show the current suns position/path. –  Dave Mackintosh Mar 30 '13 at 16:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Update: after chatting with Dave, I believe the following method will yield an accurate projection of a sun position onto a map.

Here's a quick sketch of what the projection looks like. It's (supposed to be) 3D. We want to project the sun down onto a 2D surface where x and y are our offsets for the observer, and z is the distance to the projected sun:

sun projection diagram

Known:

  • distance from earth to sun, S = 149,597,870,700 m
  • phi (sun azimuth)
  • theta (sun altitude)

What we really want is z (distance) and phi, the bearing. phi is known, so we need z. Keep in mind that S is gigantic so we should scale it down to a smaller number so our coordinates can be seen on the map. As long as we keep our new S constant, this shouldn't matter. Now, to find z:

sin(theta) = z / S, therefore z = S * sin(theta)

Once we have distance z and bearing phi, we can use these equations from movable-type to calculate a lat/lng coordinate:

var lat2 = Math.asin( Math.sin(lat1)*Math.cos(d/R) + 
          Math.cos(lat1)*Math.sin(d/R)*Math.cos(brng) );

var lon2 = lon1 + Math.atan2(Math.sin(brng)*Math.sin(d/R)*Math.cos(lat1), 
                 Math.cos(d/R)-Math.sin(lat1)*Math.sin(lat2));

where d = distance traveled = our z and R = earth's radius = 6371000 (meters)

That was easy! Now just iterate over all your sun positions and draw them on the map.

Here are some quick results, using S=1000:

Azimuth    altitude    z
110        5           87
150        20          342
180        70          939
210        20          342

Note that if you're dealing with very large distances this will not be entirely accurate due to the difficulties of modeling the Earth.

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I'm trying to gather latitude and longitude coordinates based on the altitude and azimuth as viewed by a single observer, so one single point on my map I want to visualise the path of the sun throughout the day/time. –  Dave Mackintosh Mar 30 '13 at 16:54
    
I think I understand. I think you can still use the above method. For each azim/alt, determine how far out you want the sun marker to appear (for d) and then your azimuth = bearing. –  Cianan Sims Mar 30 '13 at 16:57
    
I'll start implementing this now, thanks. I'll report back, is there any articles you can reference for this calculation at all so I could further read up on it. –  Dave Mackintosh Mar 30 '13 at 17:03
    
Just the site I linked. It has tons of resources for this sort of thing. I actually did something similar awhile back. Confusing, but possible. Good luck! –  Cianan Sims Mar 30 '13 at 17:04
    
Sudden thought (and duh! moment) I don't have a distance, I have a single static point that doesn't change. Am I missing something? –  Dave Mackintosh Mar 30 '13 at 17:06

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