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Suppose we have two lists

list_A = [1,3,4,54,3,5,6,2,6,77,73,39]
list_B = [0,3,2,8]

I want to access elements of list_A that have the values in list_B as their indices (without using loops).

After implementing it, the result should be as follows for the above case:

[1, 54, 4, 6]

Is there any easy method to do this without bothering with for loops (calling it explicitly in the code) ?

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Slightly related if you're going the numpy path: stackoverflow.com/questions/7002895/numpy-array-indexing –  Nick T Mar 30 '13 at 17:07
    
It all depends on what you mean by a for-loop. The obvious way to do it is with a list comprehension. Does [A[x] for x in B] use a for-loop? Maybe. Does map(lambda i: list_A[i], list_B)? No for-loop in sight, but there is iteration in map. How about numpy solutions? No iteration visible, but ... –  hughdbrown Mar 30 '13 at 17:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Everything will use a loop internally*, but it doesn't have to be as complicated as you might think. You can try a list comprehension:

[list_A[i] for i in list_B]

Alternatively, you could use operator.itemgetter:

list(operator.itemgetter(*list_B)(list_A))

>>> import operator
>>> list_A = [1,3,4,54,3,5,6,2,6,77,73,39]
>>> list_B = [0,3,2,8]
>>> [list_A[i] for i in list_B]
[1, 54, 4, 6]
>>> list(operator.itemgetter(*list_B)(list_A))
[1, 54, 4, 6]

* OK! Maybe you don't need a loop with recursion, but I think it's definately overkill for something like this.

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1  
Which uses a loop. But the requirement that you don't use a loop is insane. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 30 '13 at 17:00
    
@MartijnPieters Everything will, at its core, use a loop. –  arshajii Mar 30 '13 at 17:01
    
@A.R.S.: Of course, the numpy solutions use loops too, internally. As I said, the stated requirement is not attainable. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 30 '13 at 17:03
    
My intention is not to call a loop explicitly. Thank you. –  maheshakya Mar 30 '13 at 17:12
    
@A.R.S.: "...unless it uses recursion." –  hughdbrown Mar 30 '13 at 17:12

map answer

>>> list_A = [1,3,4,54,3,5,6,2,6,77,73,39]
>>> list_B = [0,3,2,8]
>>> map(lambda i: list_A[i], list_B)
[1, 54, 4, 6]

Disclaimer

I don't think this technically meets the requirement that there be no for-loop.

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If you're using numpy, you can do the following:

list_A[list_B]  // yields [1, 54, 4, 6]

Edit: As Nick T pointed out, don't forget to convert to arrays first!

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Lists should be converted to arrays before doing this, right? –  maheshakya Mar 30 '13 at 17:04
    
list_A should be. list_B doesn't have to be. arr_A = np.array(list_A) –  Cianan Sims Mar 30 '13 at 17:06

Numpy can do this with its indexing in a fairly straightforward manner. Convert the list to an array then you're gold. You can pass any sort of iterable as indices.

>>> import numpy
>>> list_A = [1,3,4,54,3,5,6,2,6,77,73,39]
>>> list_B = [0,3,2,8]
>>> numpy.array(list_A)[list_B]
array([ 1, 54,  4,  6])
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Recursion answer

No iteration/loops here. Just recursion.

>>> list_A = [1,3,4,54,3,5,6,2,6,77,73,39]
>>> list_B = [0,3,2,8]
>>> def foo(src, indexer):
...     if not indexer:
...         return []
...     else:
...         left, right = indexer[0], indexer[1:]
...         return [src[left]] + foo(src, right)
... 
>>> foo(list_A, list_B)
[1, 54, 4, 6]
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