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guys! I am trying to exchange two words in a line but it doesn't work. For example: "Today is my first day of university" should be "my is Today first day of university"

This is what I tried:

sed 's/\([a-zA-z0-9]*\)\([a-zA-z0-9]*\)\([a-zA-z0-9]*\)/\3\2\1/' filename.txt

What am I doing wrong?

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You should use an another separator as 's#pat#repl#'. For a more clearer command. –  Zulu Mar 30 '13 at 18:57

5 Answers 5

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s+(\S+)/\3 \2 \1/' file 
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Try this:

sed -rn 's/(\w+\s)(\w+\s)(\w+\s)(.*)/\3\2\1\4/p' filename.txt

-n suppress automatic printing of pattern space

-r use extended regular expressions in the script

\s for whitespace

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You would need to use 1 or more instead of zero or more, otherwise it would match the empty string and the first space if the sentence starts with whitespace for example. –  Scrutinizer Mar 31 '13 at 10:30
    
edited it. Thanks. –  Upasana Mar 31 '13 at 10:32
sed -r 's/^(\w+)(\s+\w+\s+)(\w+)(.*)/\3\2\1\4/'

with your example:

kent$  echo "Today is my first day of university"|sed -r 's/^(\w+)(\s+\w+\s+)(\w+)(.*)/\3\2\1\4/'                                                                           
my is Today first day of university

for your problem, awk is more straightforward:

awk '{t=$1;$1=$3;$3=t}1'

same input:

kent$  echo "Today is my first day of university"|awk '{t=$1;$1=$3;$3=t}1'                       
my is Today first day of university
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The GNU sed version could be shortened by removing (.*) and \4 –  Scrutinizer Mar 31 '13 at 10:32

I start to make it with \s which means any whitespaces chars.
I use it for match every words with [^\s]*which match with everything but not spaces.
And I had \s* for match withspaces between words. And don't forget to rewrite a space in replacement.

Look a this for an example:

sed 's#\([^ ]*\)\s+#\1 #'

( I use # instead of /)

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You would need to use 1 or more instead of zero or more, otherwise you would match the empty string and the first space if the sentence starts with whitespace. –  Scrutinizer Mar 31 '13 at 10:21

You are not accounting for whitespace.

use [ \t]+ between words.

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sed 's/([a-zA-z0-9]*)[\t]+([a-zA-z0-9]*)[\t]+([a-zA-z0-9]*)/\3\2\1/' filename.txt it's not working! :( –  Cucerzan Rares Mar 30 '13 at 18:53
    
\t means tab. –  Zulu Mar 30 '13 at 19:00
    
The + needs to be escaped: sed 's/\([a-zA-z0-9]*\)[ \t]\+\([a-zA-z0-9]*\)[ \t]\+\([a-zA-z0-9]*\)/\3\2\1/' filename.txt –  Gumbo Mar 30 '13 at 19:09
    
I guess this will teach me not to answer too quickly. The ultimate answer was that you did not account for whitespace in your original search string. \w+ was what I was thinking of. Thanks for the corrections. –  JimR Mar 31 '13 at 18:00

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