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I'm working with the book "Beginning Ruby", everything was going great up until the point where I got to encapsulation. I get what this piece of code is doing, I just don't know why it is set up this way with the methods.

For those interested this is the link with the page on encapsulation in the book.

class Person
    def initialize(name)
        set_name(name)
    end

    def name
        @first_name + ' ' + @last_name
    end

    def set_name(name)
        first_name, last_name = name.split(/\s+/)
        set_first_name(first_name)
        set_last_name(last_name)
    end

    def set_first_name(name)
        @first_name = name
    end

    def set_last_name(name)
        @last_name = name
    end
end

p = Person.new("Fred Bloggs")
puts p.name

It seems to me something like this can achieves the same:

class Person
    def initialize(name)
        @first_name, @last_name = name.split(/\s+/)
    end

    def name
        @first_name + ' ' + @last_name
    end
end

p = Person.new("Fred Bloggs")
puts p.name

Why go through the trouble of setting the object variables in their seperate methods?

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1  
Because you're working with encapsulation. Encapsulation means isolating the variables and exposing a safe method of accessing and modifying them. –  limelights Mar 30 '13 at 19:08
    
You can override to_s method and avoid a method named name which only purpose it's the representation of that object as text. –  kainlite Jan 14 at 3:39

4 Answers 4

Setter methods are useful to modify state of already existing object. In your case person's name is "kind of" immutable. You can't change person's name, you can only create a new person with new name.

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They are pretty much teaching you very basics of getters and setters for instance variables. Say you wanted to change the variables with the way you wrote your code you would have to access the instance variables directly. Instead, they create methods that allow you access to those variables so that you can use them outside of the class without giving complete access to the instance variables.

I'm assuming they will be leading up to attr_accessor, attr_reader, and attr_writer which are like macros that dynamically create accessors for your instance variables.

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Here you can find a similar explanation - Classes in Ruby Using Getters and Setters

p RUBY_VERSION

class Person
    def initialize(name)
        set_name(name)
    end

    def name
        @first_name + ' ' + @last_name
    end

    def set_name(name)
        first_name, last_name = name.split(/\s+/)
        set_first_name(first_name)
        set_last_name(last_name)
    end

    def set_first_name(name)
        @first_name = name
    end

    def set_last_name(name)
        @last_name = name
    end
end

John = Person.new("Fred Bloggs")
p John.name # now suppose you misrepresented the last name at time of `John` object creation. Then what would you do?

John.set_last_name "roy" # this setter method would then help you out to update the last name.

p John.name

Explanation: If you do set a person name at the time of that person like object creation,if any thing wrong information you have entered at the time creation,you can't change those. Because you don't have setter in your 2nd part of code.

Output:

"2.0.0"
"Fred Bloggs"
"Fred roy"
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Suppose you have a name like your username. The class with just the two methods is not usable in that case, while in the original class you just do something like

Person.new("Stephan").set_last_name("de Vries")
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